flush on the pavement, with that intimacy and smallness of colliers’ dwellings

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 89, chapter 11) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):
The miners’ cottages, blackened, stood flush on the pavement, with that intimacy and smallness of colliers’ dwellings over a hundred years old. They lined all the way. The road had become a street, and as you sank, you forgot instantly the open, rolling country where the castles and big houses still dominated, but like ghosts. Now you were just above the tangle of naked railway-lines, and foundries and other ‘works’ rose about you, so big you were only aware of walls.

The blue part is not easy for me. I feel it's the cottages that flush with each other, rather than the cottages that flush with that intimacy and smallness of collier's dwellings. But does the intimacy of dwelling equal the dwellings crowded together closely? And what's the use of with? can we omit it ?

Could you please give me some help?
Thank you in advance
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The miners’ cottages, blackened, stood flush* (directly adjoined to - i.e. lacking any space (or garden) to the front of the property) on the pavement, with that intimacy (feeling of close familiarity/friendship) and smallness of colliers’ dwellings over a hundred years old.

    *Today we would say flush to or flush with

    Typical miners' cottages - note how they are directly against the pavement:


     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    (1) The cottages stood on the same level as the pavement. There is no step up to get into the cottage. [Edit. I've just seen Paul's interpretation. That is a better interpretation.]

    (2) The cottages stood with an intimacy associated with hundred-year-old buildings.

    (1) and (2) are two descriptions that are independent.

    With introduces a description: it is an adverbial (or adjunct). It tells us how the cottages stood. That tells us that it will describe the kind of intimacy and smallness that the author means.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you a lot. I thought flush only used for things of the same height, but now I know it's fit for things of the same flat surface, no matter whether the surface is vertical or level.
     
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