Fly uninvited

dittoso

Member
chinese
They fly univited into our rooms on summer nights, or beat against our lighted windows.


My question is why put uninvited behid fly, it seems that univited is belong to adj, but fly is verb.
 
  • roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    To reword the sentence, dittoso:
    "They fly into our rooms, unwanted, on summer nights, or beat against our lighted windows."

    Probably insects or mosquitoes, right? They are pests--unwanted and uninvited.

    Uninvited is a participle which can be used as an adjective.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, dittoso. Welcome to the forum.

    Where did you find this sentence? Did you read it somewhere? If you did, you should tell us the title of the book or newspaper and the author's name. That is what we call "naming your source". Thank you.

    Placing the adjective "uninvited" after the verb "fly" gives the adjective special emphasis. "Uninvited" modifies the pronoun "they".
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo.

    As Owl says, "uninvited" modifies the pronoun "they". Perhaps the following alternative might suit you better:

    "Uninvited, they fly into our rooms on summer nights, or beat against our lighted windows."

    GS :)
     

    dittoso

    Member
    chinese
    sorry,I still can't understand ~ :(

    Could I say like this:
    Uninvitely(adv),they fly into our rooms on summer nights, or beat against our lighted windows."
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    In the phrase "they fly uninvited" I lean more towards interpreting uninvited as an adverb, not an adjective, though it could be either. They are uninvited (adj: they lack an invitation), they enter uninvited (adv: they enter without an invitation).
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    sorry,I still can't understand ~ :(

    Could I say like this:
    Uninvitely(adv),they fly into our rooms on summer nights, or beat against our lighted windows."
    No, Dittoso, I'm afraid you couldn't.

    This has nothing to do with their manner of flight: they fly in the same way whether you invite them or don't invite them.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, they are uninvited, and they fly erratically or swiftly or aimlessly. 'Uninvited' isn't the way they fly, so it shouldn't be turned into an adverb.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Hi Dittoso
    Perhaps you can understand that 'uninvited' as meaning 'being uninvited' or 'although being uninvited'. That past participle has a function similar to 'surrounded' in the sentence ''surrounded by the enemies, he had to fight for his life'' (being surrounded...).
     

    dittoso

    Member
    chinese
    Yes, I understand it !!! I feel I know what it's right now~!! can't be sure soo much wether I undertand it or not.
    Anyway, thanks you guys for warmly helping with my poor English : D
     
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