fold a line / fold a crease

ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello, everyone:

MATHEMATICS THROUGH PAPER FOLDING
by ALTON T. OLSON (University of Alberta)

Forming straight lines by folding creases in a piece of paper is an interesting way of discovering and demonstrating relation- ships among lines and angles.
......
56. Line symmetry
Fold a line in a sheet of paper. Cut out a kite-shaped figure similar to figures 56A and 56B.



Is it correct to say "fold creases" and "fold a line" ?
I know the author wanted to express the idea of "create a line or creases by folding the paper".

Thank you.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would say that if you fold a piece of paper in half, you get a crease, not a line.
    You cannot see a line unless you draw over the crease with a pencil.

    No doubt origami experts will say I'm wrong. :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I am OK with "fold corner A to corner B. The resulting line created by the crease..."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say that if you fold a piece of paper in half, you get a crease, not a line.
    You cannot see a line unless you draw over the crease with a pencil.

    No doubt origami experts will say I'm wrong. :)
    I agree. But in this context, considering what the whole article is about, folding a line is OK. It's clear what the author means.

    Indeed the first 'project' is entitled "1. Folding a straight line".
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I suppose so. But if I was an origami instructor, I would say make a crease (in the paper).
    It seems clear that you can only do this by folding the paper.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes. You're also folding the paper to make a crease; but we can use some verbs like this on their own results: to iron a crease into trousers, for example, or to hammer a dent into a sheet of copper.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The writing ordinarily accompanies a drawing and the drawing shows lines: (The use of "Flog" is slightly or maybe very offensive. Certainly politically incorrect.)

     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The article is more concerned with mathematics/geometry and constructing things like a line perpendicular to a given straight line, the perpendicular bisector of a given line segment, and finding the midpoint of the hypotenuse of a right triangle, etc by folding paper. So it's the lines made by the creases that are important here, not their part in the construction of a model.

    That's why I don't have a problem in this context with 'folding lines'.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    So do you mean I might probably fail at “folding out a crease” too?

    Thank you again.
    Some small remnant of the crease will always remain. That’s probably a physics issue and not an English language issue.
     

    ridgemao

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    Hello:

    “fold a crease” means to make a crease.
    “fold/press out a crease” means to eliminate a crease.

    Am I right?

    (Now I realize the difference, I thought they were same when I first asked the question)

    Thank you.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Hello:

    “fold a crease” means to make a crease.
    “fold/press out a crease” means to eliminate a crease.

    Am I right?

    (Now I realize the difference, I thought they were same when I first asked the question)

    Thank you.
    “Fold out” would not be idiomatic in American English. “Press out” is not a standard phrase, but would be my choice for “to eliminate a crease”.

    Also, “Your trousers need to be pressed; you’re losing your crease.”
     
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