"folk house" in America and Great Britain

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Hiro Sasaki

Banned
Japan, Japanese
I have searched the definition of "folk houses" but I have not found the
good one. I suppose that in American English, "folk house" means
old house for the common people in general and not necessarily farm
house.

About "folk houses" in Great Briton, I have not any idea.


Thank you

Hiro Sasaki
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Neither have I.

    Google Advanced Search returns a paltry (for Google) 79,000 hits with varied meanings, including art galleries, bed and breakfasts and restaurants.

    Apparently it's whatever the writer wants it to mean and perhaps even a cutesy derivative of Volkswagen.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Please provide a quote using this phrase and context. We can't help you without a better understanding of what you are asking.

    I know of one more use, related to music, but we won't know which one makes sense, until Hiro posts some more information.
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    http://www.allwords.com/word-folk+house.html

    noun
    1 A folk house is a term for the common houses in America. They are usually noted for the design in the front and interior of the house. These houses are usually owned by the averaged payed Americans.

    http://sawacon.org/appeal/?p=438

    I thought that the Japanese English "open-air folk houses"
    Could be understandable for English speaking people.

    In Japan, there are a dozens of open-air museums of old
    Tradition houses of the common people ( not of the ruling class)

    Hiro Sasaki
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hiro

    As you can see from the comments of the native U.S. speakers the above, the definition seems to either be a figment of the imagination of the person writing the definition.

    These houses are usually owned by the averaged payed Americans.
    The poor grammar and diction of the sentence taken from the site you reference also is an indication of the nonsense contained therein.
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    I did not cited that definition looking at "payd" and not "paid". It made
    me believe that the definition was not trustworthy.

    I am surprised to know that "folk houses" was invented by some
    Japanese. The Japanese word "Minka" is impossible to translate in
    English. It is s building of the common people, farmers, merchants
    and crafsmen and not the ruling class samurai nor noblemen. It contains
    usually a work shop besides living and sleeping space.

    There are a dozen of the open-air museums of of Minka in Japan.
    Some Japanese explain "Minka" with the word "traditional old Japanese farm houses" and others " traditional old Japanese folk houses".

    I will be careful with google information

    Thank you

    Hiro Sasaki
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Hiro Sasaki. If you're not tired of this discussion already, I can tell you that "farm house" would be widely understood here in the US. The term doesn't necessarily imply a work shop attached to the dwelling. The important thing to remember about "farm house" is that such houses are places where farmers live or have lived and are usually surrounded by agricultural fields.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "About "folk houses" in Great Britain, I have not any idea."

    Nor do I! There is no such word. That "FolkHouse" in Bristol is an adult learning centre that's been given a 'cutesy' name. In my area it is called the College of Liberal Arts.

    Presumably 'folk' is being used like the similar German word, meaning people, what we in the UK call 'ordinary' people or the common people. We have folk-songs, folk-dances and folk-stories, sometimes called 'traditional' instead of 'folk'.

    We have many open air museums in the UK, the equivalent of your "Minka".

    The nearest I can get to 'folk house' is 'traditional domestic architecture'.

    :)

    Hermione
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, "folk house" is not a set expression in British English. Bristol is a city in England and "Bristol Folk House" is a proper name, the creation of poetic license.
     
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