Follow (the) rules

Pabloester204i47

New Member
Spanish
Follow rules / Follow the rules
They both are correct , aren't they?
So, my question is the article "the" I usually don't know when to use it but I understand a little the rules to use this article.
This is just an example, Whe you use the article "the" is because you already knew the rules that you have to abide by.
And when you don't either know those rules or wether these rules weren't said before you just say it without article.
Usage of "the" for advanced grammar/sentences, I know but I need to master it. :)
(Examples-Explanations)
Thanks
 
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  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Habría que ver el contexto para apreciar adecuadamente los matices, pero, en líneas generales, la diferencia sería la misma que existe en castellano entre sigue reglas y sigue las reglas.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Habría que ver el contexto para apreciar adecuadamente los matices, pero, en líneas generales, la diferencia sería la misma que existe en castellano entre sigue reglas y sigue las reglas.
    :thumbsup:

    Here is an example where both could be used.

    Tom has trouble following rules.
    Tom has trouble following the rules.

    However, in other situations, they are not interchangeable.

    Tom was fired because he didn't follow the rules. :tick:
    Tom was fired because he didn't follow rules. :cross:

    I think the above would translate similarly into Spanish.
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Castellano (variedad chilensis)
    Hi everybody,
    Tom was fired because he didn't follow the rules. :tick:
    Tom was fired because he didn't follow rules. :cross:

    I think the above would translate similarly into Spanish.
    Yea, they would, but I fail to see why the last sentence is incorrect i. English. Can't you be fired for not following rules (in general, not the specific ones you were supposed to abide by)? In my variety of castellano, both would work.

    Lo/La despidieron porque no seguía reglas (= característica intrínseca de la persona, era alguien rebelde/desobediente)/las reglas (que le daba si jefatura).
     

    Ballenero

    Senior Member
    Spaniard
    Hi everybody,

    Yea, they would, but I fail to see why the last sentence is incorrect i. English. Can't you be fired for not following rules (in general, not the specific ones you were supposed to abide by)? In my variety of castellano, both would work.

    Lo/La despidieron porque no seguía reglas (= característica intrínseca de la persona, era alguien rebelde/desobediente)/las reglas (que le daba si jefatura).

    Se podría decir, pero si le despidieron fue por no seguir las reglas de allí.
    Fuera de allí, puede hacer lo que quiera, comportarse mansamente o llamar a la revolución.
    Pero mientras esté allí, tiene que seguir las reglas de allí.
    Por eso le despidieron, por no seguir las reglas (de allí).
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Castellano (variedad chilensis)
    Se podría decir, pero si le despidieron fue por no seguir las reglas de allí
    Entiendo lo que tratas de decir, pero siguiendo tu lógica sería incorrecto decir Lo despidieron porque era flojo, y habría que especificar de alguna manera que no lo despidieron por ser flojo en general, y hacerlo específico a la situación/empresa. Honestamente, decir ... porque no seguía reglas es correcto desde todos los puntos de vista, pienso que cuestionar esa oración es hilar muy fino.
     
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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yea, they would, but I fail to see why the last sentence is incorrect in English. Can't you be fired for not following rules (in general, not the specific ones you were supposed to abide by)?
    The second one is incorrect because it means that he was fired because he has a personality that tends not to follow rules. However, as Ballenero mentions above, the situation here refers to the failure to follow a specific set of rules, rather than rules in general.

    Here is an example where it would be correct to omit the article.

    -Did you hire John Smith?
    -No, his former employer said that he has a hard time following rules.
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Castellano (variedad chilensis)
    Thanks, gengo. However, I still fail to see the difference between your correct example and the original sentence in which you say it doesn't work. I'm not questioning what you say as regards the English sentence, but in Spanish both versions would work, whatever the case. In my country at least.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks, gengo. However, I still fail to see the difference between your correct example and the original sentence in which you say it doesn't work. I'm not questioning what you say as regards the English sentence, but in Spanish both versions would work, whatever the case. In my country at least.
    I guess En and Sp are different in this respect.

    The difference is simply that "follow the rules" refers to a specific set of rules (company rules, school rules, etc.), while "follow rules" refers to a person's proclivity to follow all rules, in general.

    Let me try to use both in an example.
    -If you don't follow the rules, you'll be fired. Anyone who can't follow rules shouldn't be working here.

    In the first instance, the speaker is referring to the rules of the job, and in the second, to all the rules in the world.
     

    S.V.

    Senior Member
    Español, México
    I guess En and Sp are different in this respect.
    :thumbsup: Gengo highlights a curious difference. In this case, the English version sounds like "porque no siguió reglas". Also odd to our ears.

    And we avoid a much longer answer, saying curious :p (with seguía, closer to he would not follow any rules)
     
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