(food) is orange

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kategogogo

Senior Member
Japanese Mandrain bilingual
I'm an American. I can use chopsticks. We eat Chinese food in America, too. But often it's expensive and orange.

What does "orange" refer to here? Not the orange color I suppose, because I can't make a connection between being orange and being expensive. Is it a slang? :confused:

Thank you for reading my question.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'm not sure what "orange" refers to in that sentence, Kate. I suspect that it does refer to the color orange. Some popular "Chinese" dishes in the U.S. do seem to feature orange-colored sauces. "Sweet and sour" anything is likely to have a reddish-orange sauce.

    Who wrote the sentence? What is the name of the book or the article where you found it? Please remember to name the source of anything you quote in here. Thank you.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm not sure what "orange" refers to in that sentence, Kate. I suspect that it does refer to the color orange. Some popular "Chinese" dishes in the U.S. do seem to feature orange-colored sauces. "Sweet and sour" anything is likely to have a reddish-orange sauce.

    Who wrote the sentence? What is the name of the book or the article where you found it? Please remember to name the source of anything you quote in here. Thank you.
    I agree. In many restaurants here too the sweet and sour sauce is bright orange. This is changing slowly . . .

    In the OP, the facts that the food is expensive and that it's orange are not related.
     

    kategogogo

    Senior Member
    Japanese Mandrain bilingual
    Thank you heypresto and owlman5 for being so helpful. :)

    @owlman5 : The sentence was taken from a book about the experience of a US writter when he lived in the most north easten part of China. The original paragraph goes like this:

    I read that the comedian Steve Martin used to hand autograph seekers a signed name card that confirmed the person had met Steve Martin and found him to be "warm, polite, and funny". At times, like on this bus-I wished I had a similar card to present that would answer the usual questions strangers asked of me, in this order: I'm American. I have been in China for a long time. I was born in the Year of Rat. I don't have a salary, I'm a writer and a volunteer teacher. Yes I can use chopsticks. We eat Chinese food in America, too. But often it's expensive and orange.

    After this, no more context about "orange" Chinese food:rolleyes:. I agree with your interpretation, he was talking about the colour of the sauces. It matches what my friends told me about the Chinese food in the US: they taste much more "sweet and sour" than those in China because of the large amount of "orange" sauce.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Thank you, Kate, for doing such a fine job with the source and the context. That really helps.

    I'm glad that you found our explanations believable and helpful.
     
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