(food-)starved regime vs. (food-)starving regime

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JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
Donald Trump recently tweeted:
North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the “Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times.” Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!
I think there should be a hyphen in "food-starved".
Now, can the noun phrase his depleted and food-starved regime be rephrased as follows?
(1) his depleted and food-starving regime
(2) his depleted and starved regime
(3) his depleted and starving regime
 
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  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think there should be a hyphen in "food-starved"
    :thumbsup:
    Now, can the noun phrase his depleted and food-starved regime be rephrased as follows?
    (1) his depleted and food-starving regime
    (2) his depleted and starved regime
    (3) his depleted and food-starving regime
    No.

    (1) his depleted and food-starving regime = his depleted regime that food starves." "food-starves" is simply not idiomatic.
    (2) his depleted and starved regime - His regime is not starved, the people/the country are being starved
    (3) his depleted and food-starving regime - see (1)
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Oxygen-starved is a common collocation. Other compounds are formed with -starved on this pattern.

    Food-starved sounds a bit tautologous. Also, it is not exactly the regime that is starved - if anything the Great Leader could do with losing a bit of weight!
     
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    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    (1) his depleted and food-starving regime = his depleted regime that food starves." "food-starves" is simply not idiomatic.
    (2) his depleted and starved regime - His regime is not starved, the people/the country are being starved
    (3) his depleted and food-starving regime - see (1)
    How could (1) mean "his depleted regime that food starves"?

    In (2), do you really think that Trump is differentiating the regime from the people/the country? If so, how could he say his depleted regime?
    I think either starved or starving inherently involves food, so I don't know how simply leaving out food as in (2) can be problematic.

    In (3), it was a typo. I have corrected (3) to his depleted and starving regime.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    How could (1) mean "his depleted regime that food starves"?
    Is that a serious question?
    In (2), do you really think that Trump is differentiating the regime from the people/the country?
    Why, otherwise, would I say it? That said, (i) "Twitter" should never, ever be taken as a good example of English. (ii) Who knows exactly what Mr Trump meant?
    In (3), it was a typo. I have corrected (3) to his depleted and starving regime.
    Yes, that's OK but not great - "to his depleted regime and starving people.":thumbsup:

    In my comments, I told you how I understood your versions while, at the same time, ignoring the error of "food-starving".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I am broadly taking "regime" to be the whole of the Juche Party... the "regime" that requires "change". :D:eek:
     
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