Fool me once, strike one. Fool me twice, strike three!

GiulioV.

New Member
Italiano
Fool me once, strike one. Fool me twice, strike three!

E' una frase pronunciata da Michael Scott in "The office".E' una parodia del detto americano "fool me once shame you me,fool me twice shame on me!",ma non riesco a comprenderne il significato.
 
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  • Matrap

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Penso che sia un parallelo con il baseball dove il terzo strike significa l'eliminazione del battitore. Il senso è "fregami una volta, ok; fregami una seconda volta e con me hai chiuso"
     

    GiulioV.

    New Member
    Italiano
    Grazie per la risposta @Matrap.
    Anchio pensavo ad una cosa del genere,ma non riesco a capire perchè questa frase faccia ridere gli americani a crepapelle....
     
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    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    My guess is that people laugh because it's an absurd variation on the original and doesn't make any sense. Nobody would ever mix up the metaphor like that (although George W. Bush once fouled up the expression in a news conference and was ridiculed for it), so it comes out funny. The guy is trying be sage, and ends up sounding like a fool.
     

    GiulioV.

    New Member
    Italiano
    Thanks @marcolettici,so this sentence is a joke,it doesn't make any sense.Can you translate it in italian language?
     

    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=248393

    This thread of a few years ago talks about the original expression. GoodVibes said: "Se mi inganni una volta ti devi vergognare ma se mi inganni due volte mi devo vergognare io!" and that seems to get the meaning well. In this case, "Se mi inganni una volta, "strike one," ma se mi inganni due volte, "strike 3!" (Strike 3 refers to your last chance... you're eliminated.) As you can see, the original saying has been confused and mixed up with a sports metaphor and makes no real sense.
     

    Scopa Nuova

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In AE The phrase, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me, means:

    If I did something wrong or foolish The first time you fooled me, that was you fault. But If you fool me a second time (over the same thing or issue) that makes me dumb because I didn't recognize it as fooling me.

    If you have followed the cartoon "Peanuts" it has a perfect example of this when every year during (American) football season, Lucy pretends she will hold the football for Charlie Brown to kick and at the last instant she pulls it away and he falls flat on his face.

    SN:)
     
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    GiulioV.

    New Member
    Italiano
    So... the sentence "Fool me once,strike one,fool me twice,strike three!" could be traslated in italian language(roughly) :"Se mi freghi una volta sei uno stronzo,se mi freghi due volte allora sei proprio uno stronzo!"... Isn't it?
     

    Tonza

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Or sticking with the sports analogy, something like:

    Fregami una volta, cartellino giallo. Fregami due volte, cartellino rosso.

    Does it work?
     

    Blackman

    Senior Member
    Italiano/Sardo
    Io non la farei così tragica. A me sembra piuttosto un elogio di se stessi, piu' che una minaccia di troncare ogni rapporto. " Io sono un dritto, se mi freghi una volta vale uno. Ma se riesci a fregarmi due volte, vale molto di piu' del doppio...."

    Ma e' solo un'impressione.
     

    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    The expression "Shame on you!" is quite common when reprimanding a child for straying from the moral path; for lying, stealing, hurting another's feelings, tricking someone to gain advantage. Is there an equivalent expression in Italian? "Ti devi vergognare?"
     

    GiulioV.

    New Member
    Italiano
    @Blackman,vedi il concetto generale non è di tragicità bensì è l'opposto.La frase in calce è una voluta "storpiatura" del detto originale:"Fool me once,shame on you,fool me twice,shame on me".Tale "storpiatura" evidentemente porta ad un "non sense" o probabilmente ad un significato opposto all'originale che fa ridere gli Americani.
     

    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    The saying is intended to warn a person to be vigilent with others who may be unscrupulous, and to take responsibility for being aware and not gullible. It is ok to be trusting the first time, because that is a sign of graciousness and good-will. So, if you are taken advantage of a first time, it is not your "fault" or issue, but rather the issue of the person who took advantage of you. (Shame on you! (them)) But if you allow the same person to take advantage of you a second time, you are the fool, because you didn't learn. (Shame on me!)
     
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