Fool Somebody Around

MB

Senior Member
Polish
Never before hearing the song Trinity (Titoli) had I encountered this phrase. What's this one mean? I did try to look it up in the most popular dictionaries but actually my attempt finally led me nowhere but to our forum.

He's the guy who's the talk of the town
with the restless gun
don't shoot broad out to fool him around
and

You weren't glad at your fooling him around
when you'ev seen him use a gun, boy
 
  • MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I am as puzzled as you! I am not familiar with "to fool someone around" - but that song is Italian, isn't it?
    Hm, I don't know any etymology of this song, but the version I know is just an all-English one. To tell you the pure truth, I came across this song while watching Django Unchained (it's got a very good soundtrack, by the way).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In addition to our usual caution about never using song lyrics as a source for grammatical English, I will add this information:
    This was originally the theme song to the 1970 movie "They Call Me Trinity." The movie is a "spaghetti Western" - a movie about the American West made in Italy mainly by Italians.
     

    MB

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Actually little did my question have to do with the grammatical front of English, I believe. Rather semantic. I just thought and still think it can be just another regionalism or idiosyncrasy I haven't heard of so far.
     
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