football-a couple of passes and a shot is called? action? attack?

MedaBeda

Senior Member
Czech
Hello,

In football, when a team has a couple of passes that can lead to a player shooting at a goal (scoring or not scoring), we (Czechs) would call this whole "process" that can be finished by a shot (but does not have to) an action that the attacking team has created. So we would say that a team has had e.g. 10 good actions from which 2 led to a goal.

How would it be called in English? Attack? Or does another word or expression comes to mind?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It depends on exactly how it turned out but there are different terms that can be used.

    It could be called a "set up" for the player who finally shot at goal. For example: Rakitic and Perisic set up Modric to score in the 15th minute with accurate passes. (Sorry, I'm not very familiar with current Czech players or I'd have used Czech examples.:))

    The word "set piece", which you've probably heard, is used in the context of free kicks to describe a particular play that's been rehearsed in practice.

    Another word is, as you suggested, "attack", or "counter-attack". A and B combined for an attack in the 45th which ended with C shooting at goal from a sharp angle.

    It depends on the sentence structure and exact context.

     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Hello Barque,

    the Czechs currently dont create too many chances /that was pretty visible in their last match against England/ so it is difficult to use their names in these kind of sentences:) But thanks for saying that :)

    The word I am searching for is the name for this whole "process" of passes that can lead to a player shooting at a goal (but he does not have to). Attack sounds ok - because we could say that a team had 10 attacks from which 2 goals were scored.
     
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