football results

nurdug51

Senior Member
Germany,German
How do you pronouce the result of a match/game?

two to one or two one ?
3 : 3 is ...........?
 
  • FRENFR

    Senior Member
    English
    Yes. To add to that correct concept, we say the numbers, highest first, followed by "to + the country".

    I don't know the Germany v Agentina score, (ok ok i'll look)...

    Ok. It was ONE ALL. That doesn't help my example. IF it WERE 2-1 in Germany's favor, we'd say something like:

    Hey mate did you watch/see the game?

    Yea I did.

    What was the score?/Who won?

    It was two one to Germany

    (although the real response would be): it was a draw / it was 1 all.
     

    FRENFR

    Senior Member
    English
    Germany over Argentina? Is that what you say in the states? I have never heard that and I watch/takl about a LOT of football with a variety of people.

    I just looked at the Google results and it said 1 - 1. I assumed it had finished.
     

    nurdug51

    Senior Member
    Germany,German
    FRENFR said:
    Yes. To add to that correct concept, we say the numbers, highest first, followed by "to + the country".

    I don't know the Germany v Agentina score, (ok ok i'll look)...

    Thanks a lot, FRENFR.
    How do you pronounce the v in Germany v ARgentina?
     

    grasshopper

    Member
    England
    FRENFR said:
    Well yes "a win over" You just said "Germany over agentina" ;)
    I agree, "a win over" is fine, but in the UK we'd never say something like: "It was 4 to 2, Germany over Argentina"...it sounds like American sports scores to us.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    nurdug51 said:
    FRENFR said:
    Yes. To add to that correct concept, we say the numbers, highest first, followed by "to + the country".

    I don't know the Germany v Agentina score, (ok ok i'll look)...

    Thanks a lot, FRENFR.
    How do you pronounce the v in Germany v ARgentina?

    Some people just say Vee, but it really should be versus.

    It comes from Latin, and means against.
    Sometimes written as vs.

    As well as its use in sport,
    it is used in reference to court cases.
    Roe versus Wade
    The Commonwealth of Massachusets versus Henry J Smith
    The People versus Larry Flint
    R [Regina or Rex] versus Bloggs
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I agree that v and vs are pronounced "versus," but this might be changing. "Roe vee Wade" has become a set phrase in AE, and it will have a deleterious effect on the standard pronunciation.
    .
     

    grasshopper

    Member
    England
    Brioche is right, although it's interesting to note that "versus" doesn't exist in Spanish (obviously a language derived from Latin), although I'm not sure about other Romance or Germanic languages.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    grasshopper said:
    Brioche is right, although it's interesting to note that "versus" doesn't exist in Spanish (obviously a language derived from Latin), although I'm not sure about other Romance or Germanic languages.
    The original Latin versus, as an adverb or preposition,means towards or in the direction of.
    In French it became vers, and in Italian verso.

    The same Latin root, an a noun, means row, line, furrow or verse
    Hence verse in English, vers in French, verso in Italian and verso in Spanish for a line of poetry.

    In German one team plays gegen another.
    Gegen = against, and is etymologically related to the English words against and again.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Brioche said:
    The original Latin versus, as an adverb or preposition,means towards or in the direction of.
    In French it became vers, and in Italian verso.

    The same Latin root, an a noun, means row, line, furrow or verse
    Hence verse in English, vers in French, verso in Italian and verso in Spanish for a line of poetry.

    In German one team plays gegen another.
    Gegen = against, and is etymologically related to the English words against and again.
    I love Latin comments...

    All I can add to your already-stellar explanation, Brioche, is that the Latin versus comes from the verb vertere, meaning "to turn (toward/against)"; so versus = turned toward/against; hence, the adverb/preposition versus. As for the noun versus, obviously the original meaning was "a turning," but later was used for "a turning of the plough"; hence, "a furrow"; and then "a row," "a line," etc.

    Also, the Indo-European root for vertere is wer-, and a German word for "to turn" is werden. Now, whether or not there is a way to get from werden to gegen etymologically/cognately, I don't know enough German to say. But it's interesting anyway.


    Brian
     

    FRENFR

    Senior Member
    English
    Grasshopper, as was said, we just say the letter "V" (vee). Odd isn't it when you think about in, fellow English speakers.

    By the way, someone corrected me about the score, but watching BBC News 24 this morning, (too early), they said it was 1 all....which is what I saw. Perhaps the 4-2 said by french4beth was the penalty shoot out result at the end!

    To add to that, we wouldn't say the results of penalties in a "regular match" style...such as when you corrected me by saying "It was 4-2 to Germany". Well, yes, perhaps with penalties (I didn't watch the game so I don't have details), but I (and everyone I know) would make more of a sentence about it, to signify the penalty shoot-out at the end...Something like:

    What was the Germany Agentina score? Oh one all but germany one on penalties 3 to 1" (or whatever it was)...
     
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