Football Terminology

Pirlo

Senior Member
English
Ciao a tutti,
There are a few terms that I have been reading about in Italian regarding Football. However, I'm not sure what the formula is! :(

For example:
Tiro = Shot on Goal
Tuffo = Dive
Rete = Goal

In order to place these words into a sentence, would they be combined with fare? For example, I know to say for example: "Pirlo ha fatto un goal", is this the same formula for tiro and tuffo? Example: Adriano ha fatto un tuffo! Is this the correct method? :D

Thanks,
Pirlo
 
  • _forumuser_

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I think you are asking about the verbs relative to these nouns:

    to score = segnare. Fare goal is less common.
    to dive = tuffarsi, buttarsi (pronominali :D)
    to shoot = tirare, calciare

    Adriano si e' tuffato in modo spudorato. Materazzi ha tirato il rigore e ha segnato. But their evil conspiracy hasn't worked anyway! Go Roma! :)
     

    Pirlo

    Senior Member
    English
    I think you are asking about the verbs relative to these nouns:

    to score = segnare. Fare goal is less common.
    to dive = tuffarsi, buttarsi (pronominali :D)
    to shoot = tirare, calciare
    Yep, that's exactly what I wanted to know! I was unsure of the structure though. What about: Pirlo is taking the corner kick. Would this use a similar structure?

    Adriano si e' tuffato in modo spudorato. Materazzi ha tirato il rigore e ha segnato. But their evil conspiracy hasn't worked anyway! :D
    Ah, you didn't take long to catch onto it! ;)
     

    _forumuser_

    Senior Member
    Italian
    For free kicks and corner kicks you use battere (and less frequently tirare or calciare).

    Pirlo batte il calcio d'angolo.
    Dalla bandierina, Pirlo.
    Pirlo si incarica della battuta.
    Alla battuta, Pirlo.

    These are all fine.
     

    Pirlo

    Senior Member
    English
    For free kicks and corner kicks you use battere (and less frequently tirare or calciare).

    Pirlo batte il calcio d'angolo.
    Dalla bandierina, Pirlo.
    Pirlo si incarica della battuta.
    Alla battuta, Pirlo.

    These are all fine.
    Ah! Excellent. The bandierina being the Corner Flag, I'm assuming? So are there any other terms that follow this trend, otherwise, another trend? For example: Totti hit the post! Totti ha calciato la traversa?

    What would I do without you FU? My "embittered Roma fan" (direct quote, hehe :p)
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Ah! Excellent. The bandierina being the Corner Flag, I'm assuming? So are there any other terms that follow this trend, otherwise, another trend? For example: Totti hit the post! Totti ha colpito la traversa?

    What would I do without you FU? My "embittered Roma fan" (direct quote, hehe :p)
    ;)
     

    Pirlo

    Senior Member
    English
    Great! Thank you: FU, Murphy and Federicoft! Now I can listen to RAI's online football telecasts and have no problem interpreting these terms! :D:D
     

    Karl!!!!

    Senior Member
    England/English
    In English we can say

    He hit the post
    He hit the (cross)bar
    He hit the woodwork

    Woodwork includes the posts and the crossbar. Is it similar in Italian?
     

    Lello4ever

    Senior Member
    Italia - Italiano
    We say:
    "Totti ha centrato la traversa!"
    "Totti ha preso la traversa!"
    "Totti ha colpito la traversa!"
    Instead of traversa you can also say legno
    "Ha preso il legno!"

    Other sentences that come to mind:
    when shooting out: "Non va!" "Fuori!" "Tiro completamente da dimenticare!" "Fuori di poco" "Sfiora/scheggia la traversa" "Di poco a lato"....
    when ready to kick the ball: "E' un buon tiratore!" "Prepara il tiro!" "Carica il destro/sinistro"...
    when dribbling: "Dribbla l'avversario" "Supera l'avversario" "Lo lascia lì"...
    and more and more...

    Another almost idiomatic expression at the end of the first half:
    "E ora tutti a bere un thè caldo" :D:D
     

    Pirlo

    Senior Member
    English
    I have a few more questions which pertain to this!:D What would be some appropriate phrases to describe excellent goals, or the more commonly known "Wonder goal" -- is there a direct translation for this? Also in that phrase: "E ora tutti a bere un thè caldo" -- what does the bold text mean? I haven't been familiarised with it before! :confused:

    Thanks,
    Pirlo

    (Thank you for everyone's contribution, I'm very appreciative of it.)
     

    Lello4ever

    Senior Member
    Italia - Italiano
    Per indicare un "wonder goal" si può dire:
    "Gran gol/splendido/stupendo gol di Totti"
    "Capolavoro di Totti"
    "Gol da cineteca"
    "Magia di Totti"
    "Prodezza di Totti"....
    Notice that in Italian we often use gol instead of the original goal.

    About thè or tè it is simply tea... "Tutti a bere un thè caldo" it's a sentence by the Sky commentator Caressa meaning "Now all the players go and drink hot tea" :D
     
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