football; when you don't score a goal, you usually ...

stargazer

Senior Member
Slovenia, Slovenian
Hello everyone

I'm part of a team that's working on a Slovenian-English dictionary and would like some help with the example described below.
I have to translate a few collocations with "goal". One of them was "to score a goal", while the other is in a way the opposite - when the opposite team scores one. In Slovenian, you would say "to get a goal" (literal translation, mind you). How would you express this in English?

Thanks ;)
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello everyone

    I'm part of a team that's working on a Slovenian-English dictionary and would like some help with the example described below.
    I have to translate a few collocations with "goal". One of them was "to score a goal", while the other is in a way the opposite - when the opposite team scores one. In Slovenian, you would say "to get a goal" (literal translation, mind you). How would you express this in English?

    Thanks ;)
    In a match Slovenia versus England, if Slovenia score a goal, England are said to concede a goal.

    The opposite of to score a goal is to concede a goal.

    P.S. I've just seen Haylette's post. We do say let in, but that's more particularly for the defence, perhaps, or the goalkeeper particularly. I think concede is the normal word for the whole team. It's an odd use of the word because it suggests consent, albeit reluctant consent.
     

    stargazer

    Senior Member
    Slovenia, Slovenian
    Hello Haylette & Thomas Tompion

    Thank you very much! I really appreciate your help.

    :thumbsup:
     
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