footing or jogging?

antonisimo

Senior Member
Español, Perú
I found these words mean the same

What is the difference between these words?

Please help me with this.

Thanks in advance
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    I found these words mean the same

    What is the difference between these words?

    Please help me with this.

    Thanks in advance

    "Footing" would not be used in American English as a synonym for "jogging." Footing has several meanings in AmE, none of which relate to jogging or running.
     
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    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    Jogging is a verb that means running slowly and gently.

    Footing (noun) refers to the action of balancing in an upright position on an uneven or slippery surface.

    Example

    He nearly fell over on the ice but managed to regain his footing.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Jogging is a verb that means running slowly and gently.

    Footing (noun) refers to the action of balancing in an upright position.
    It also refers to an underpinning or foundation; and, as a verb, can refer to paying a bill or shouldering the cost of something.

    It is also used in soccer, e.g. "Robinho produced a moment of magic to score the second goal. He took a return pass off Kaká’s heel, exchanged passes with Grafite before side-footing the ball inside the post." [http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/sports/soccer/04iht-SOCCER.html]
     

    airportzombie

    Senior Member
    English - CaE/AmE
    Be careful of false friends, antonisimo; although footing in Spanish is the equivalent of the English jogging, footing in English does not mean jogging. There are a few English words out there that have been borrowed into other languages and have lost their original English meaning. If you searched for footing in the WR English–Spanish dictionary, the results will not show jogging as a definition.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    Remarkably I found the following in the Merriam-Webster dictionary (which I believe is the authoritative source for American English). http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/footing

    Definition of FOOTING
    1
    : a stable position or placing of the feet
    2
    : a surface or its condition with respect to one walking or running on it; especially : the condition of a racetrack
    3
    : the act of moving on foot : step, tread


    This still isn't jogging but the usage surprises me. I have never heard it used in that way.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    Footing is used in this sense in the phrase first footing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First-Foot
    Nice example but I remain unconvinced. You seem to suggest first (foot-ing), but I read it like this: (first-foot)-ing.

    Note
    It is quite common in English to talk about (noun)-ing where noun is an activity.
    Example:
    Let's go (basket-ball)-ing. :tick:
    Let's go basket (balling). :cross:
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If my bike is broken and no-one will give me a ride, I guess I'll just have to hoof it.

    That expression is what came to my mind when I tried to imagine what footing might mean - going on foot, i.e. simply walking.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    If my bike is broken and no-one will give me a ride, I guess I'll just have to hoof it.

    That expression is what came to my mind when I tried to imagine what footing might mean - going on foot, i.e. simply walking.
    Good point! Of course there is the expression "to hot-foot it".

    He is hot-footing it down the road.

    However I still say this means (hot-foot)-ing and not hot-(footing)
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    You'll not hear it commonly used ... now:
    foot (verb)
    2. intr. a. To move the feet as in walking; to step, pace, walk, go on foot. ... Now rare.
    OED
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    It seems to me to be a typical Franglais (substitute Spenglish etc) expression. In French footing is used to mean jogging. The word was obviously borrowed from English, but I am not sure that it was ever used in the same way as the French. To me a lot of Franglais expressions bear a very slight similarity to English. Apart from "first footing", which means visiting one's neighbours house on New Year's Eve, it normally means stance as in "He lost his footing and fell five feet to the ground and broke his ankle".
     
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