for a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven

farzaneh.N

Member
Persian - Iran
Dear all!
Can you please help me get what this sentence mean? I cannot divide it into chunks to get its meaning.


Her recent acts have taken away the last miserable pretext for passive submission. She has justified us before the world, and ennobled the timid, humble supplication of a degraded, insulted people, into the proud demand for independence by a resolved, prepared, and fearless Nation …
Oh! for a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven, and the monumental barricades stretching across each of our noble streets, made desolate by England – circling around that doomed Castle [Dublin Castle, seat of British administration in Ireland], made infamous by England, where the foreign tyrant has held his council of treason and iniquity against our people and our country for seven hundred years.

Thanks!
Reference: Translation in the Digital Age by Michael Cronin
 
  • Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    Hello Farzaneh.N

    Well i'm not very sound at the English language but i would like to try.

    The whole passage is sarcastic.

    a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven ... thousands of guns ( a gun with a long barrel, used in the past ) had been fired because of Heaven ( a better place) .

    made desolate by England – circling around that doomed Castle made infamous by England ..... was actually destroyed by England ( A desolate place is empty and not attractive, with no people or nothing pleasant in it) and their control over our old castle made it infamous ( it is humiliating).


    where the foreign tyrant has held his council of treason and iniquity against our people and our country for seven hundred years.

    Where the tyrants of England held their council of treason and iniquity (a very wrong and unfair action or situation ) against our people and our country , which are actually victims .

    Hope you don't mind if i am wrong anywhere.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Looks right to me, shri. I would add that there are many cultural and historical references or allusions which would primarily be evident only to someone steeped in the background of Ireland's conflicts with England (and I am not so well versed). The "barricades" reference is difficult to gloss, for example, but guns (muskets) were an extremely important element of the Irish rebellion over generations. Many people risked their lives (and sometimes lost) running guns illegally to Ireland. You would need to break it down to each constituent part.

    I'm not sure that helps, but I think you're off to a good start.
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    This is a passionate appeal written by Jane Elgee (later Lady Wilde, mother of Oscar), under the pseudonym of Speranza, in the Dublin periodical Nation, calling for rebellion by the Irish against England. The editor was tried for treason nine times, but not convicted.
     
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    farzaneh.N

    Member
    Persian - Iran
    Hello Farzaneh.N

    Well i'm not very sound at the English language but i would like to try.

    The whole passage is sarcastic.

    a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven ... thousands of guns ( a gun with a long barrel, used in the past ) had been fired because of Heaven ( a better place) .

    made desolate by England – circling around that doomed Castle made infamous by England ..... was actually destroyed by England ( A desolate place is empty and not attractive, with no people or nothing pleasant in it) and their control over our old castle made it infamous ( it is humiliating).


    where the foreign tyrant has held his council of treason and iniquity against our people and our country for seven hundred years.

    Where the tyrants of England held their council of treason and iniquity (a very wrong and unfair action or situation ) against our people and our country , which are actually victims .

    Hope you don't mind if i am wrong anywhere.
    Hi Shri!
    That is understandable now. Thanks for your good reply. :)
     

    farzaneh.N

    Member
    Persian - Iran
    Looks right to me, shri. I would add that there are many cultural and historical references or allusions which would primarily be evident only to someone steeped in the background of Ireland's conflicts with England (and I am not so well versed). The "barricades" reference is difficult to gloss, for example, but guns (muskets) were an extremely important element of the Irish rebellion over generations. Many people risked their lives (and sometimes lost) running guns illegally to Ireland. You would need to break it down to each constituent part.

    I'm not sure that helps, but I think you're off to a good start.
    Dear Redwoodgrove! thanks for the confirmation and for the supplementary information. That is really helpful. :)
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Oh! for a hundred thousand muskets
    There is no main verb in the sentence. This phrase means 'I long to see a hundred thousand muskets'. The writer wishes there were an army of Irish patriots fighting for independence in the streets of Dublin and the rest of the sentence carries on that thought in eloquent terms.
     
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    farzaneh.N

    Member
    Persian - Iran
    This is a passionate appeal written by Jane Elgee (later Lady Wilde, mother of Oscar), under the pseudonym of Speranza, in the Dublin periodical Nation, calling for rebellion by the Irish against England. The editor was tried for treason nine times, but not convicted.
    Dear Wandle!
    You are right. Thanks.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    This is a passionate appeal written by Jane Elgee (later Lady Wilde, mother of Oscar), under the pseudonym of Speranza, in the Dublin periodical Nation, calling for rebellion by the Irish against England. The editor was tried for treason nine times, but not convicted.
    !!
    We Americans, I think, tend to forget that Oscar was Irish, not English. Fascinating history of Jane.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Putting barricades across the streets is how you fight in a city, to make a 'no-go' area. The Irish nationalists could lay siege to the castle and try to capture it. It had been a prehistoric hill fortress, then a Viking castle, then built by the Norman English King John in the mid-13th century.

    Oh! for a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven,

    I wish we had 100,000 rifles shining in the sun

    and the monumental barricades stretching across each of our noble streets,

    and I wish we had huge barricades across our noble streets

    made desolate by England

    ruined by the English
    – circling around that doomed Castle [Dublin Castle, seat of British administration in Ireland],
    [barricades] which would encircle Dublin Castle

    made infamous by England, where the foreign tyrant has held his council of treason and iniquity against our people and our country for seven hundred years
    .
    [from] where a treacherous and evil council [Irish, Anglo-Irish, English representatives] of the foreign tyrant [British government] has governed our people and country for over 700 years.
     
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    farzaneh.N

    Member
    Persian - Iran
    Putting barricades across the streets is how you fight in a city, to make a 'no-go' area. The Irish nationalists could lay siege to the castle and try to capture it. It had been a prehistoric hill fortress, then a Viking castle, then built by the Norman English King John in the mid-12th century

    Oh! for a hundred thousand muskets glittering brightly in the light of heaven,

    I wish we had 100,000 rifles shining in the sun

    and the monumental barricades stretching across each of our noble streets,

    and I wish we had huge barricades across our noble streets

    made desolate by England

    ruined by the English
    – circling around that doomed Castle [Dublin Castle, seat of British administration in Ireland],
    [barricades] which would encircle Dublin Castle

    made infamous by England, where the foreign tyrant has held his council of treason and iniquity against our people and our country for seven hundred years
    .
    [from] where a treacherous and evil council [Irish, Anglo-Irish, English representatives] of the foreign tyrant [England] has governed our people and country for over 700 years.
    Dear Hermione!
    That was great! Really thanks!
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    barricades
    The article was published, I gather, in July of 1848. It is likely that Jane Elgee had the European revolutions of that year (the 'Spring of Nations') in mind.
    Barricades were set up and defended by revolutionaries in various capital cities.

    This is Vernet's painting 'Barricade in Rue Soufflot' (from Wikimedia):

    Paris Barricade.jpg
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    A couple of factual points:
    I wish we had 100,000 rifles shining in the sun
    A musket is not a rifle. A musket is a smooth-bore weapon firing a round ball. A rifle fires a pointed cylindrical bullet from a barrel with incised spiral grooves (rifling), which make the bullet spin, giving greater accuracy and range.

    The figure of 100,000 was never in the realm of possibility for a small agricultural country. Ireland fought for and obtained independence seventy years later with much smaller numbers.
     
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