for a little more coin?

What is meant by the phrase "for a little more coin" in the following excerpt?

2. Misleading their position
Here, our counterpart deliberately falsifies their actual position to alter the range of the negotiation zone. One example is when our counterpart sits blandly across the table and boldly demands more or they will walk away in a huff. Actually, they really are ready to settle, but are just trying to squeeze a little bit more juice out of you for a little more coin
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In this case, 'juice' is not the same as 'coin'. What kind of negotiation is going on here? Who is getting paid by whom, and for what? And so on.

    (Also, please name the source of every quotation.)
     

    Sharifa345

    Senior Member
    USA
    US English, DR Spanish

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    While I don't like slang in my business-tips advice, I don't think it's redundant. I think the key is the red bit -- they are demanding more ("trying to squeeze a little bit more juice of you") for a little more money (that they will pay you).

    One example is when our counterpart sits blandly across the table and boldly demands more or they will walk away in a huff. Actually, they really are ready to settle, but are just trying to squeeze a little bit more juice out of you for a little more coin.

    Although in reality, I would expect them to want a lot more juice for a little more coin.
     
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