(for) a long time

nurdug51

Senior Member
Germany,German
a).......when people have a long time no water ....

Could you accept this word order as correct?

Or must you write: b).... when people have no water for a long time....

Apart from the word order the word for seems to be necessary in b).
But is it necessary in a) as well? (if a is wrong it's irrelevant anyway)

nurdug 51
 
  • Siberia

    Senior Member
    UK-Wales - English
    a).......when people have a long time no water ....:cross:

    Could you accept this word order as correct?

    Or must you write: b).... when people have no water for a long time...:tick: .

    Apart from the word order the word for seems to be necessary in b).
    But is it necessary in a) as well? (if a is wrong it's irrelevant anyway)

    nurdug 51
     

    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa

    Banned
    Tamil
    1. People have no water for a long time.
    2. People have no water for long.
    3. People have no water long.
    Are all these sentences OK? Do they mean the same?
    Thanks.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Sentence 3 means nothing to me.
    Sentence 2 sounds odd. It makes sense if you write People don't have water for long (=they have water for a short time).
    Sentence 1 is fine.
     

    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa

    Banned
    Tamil
    I have changed the sentences as below:
    1. I haven't had a cigarette for long.
    2. We haven't been here for long.
    3. We haven't been here long.
    Are they correct now. Please comment. Thanks.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Sentences 2 & 3 are ok.
    But no. 1 suggests that you haven't owned a cigarette for long (it works with a car instead of a cigarette).
    You have to say for a long time or for ages.

    Don't ask me why this is so! :) Maybe someone else has an idea.

    I haven't had a cigarette for long.:confused:
    I haven't had a cigarette for ages/for a long time.
    I haven't been smoking this cigarette for long.
    I haven't been smoking cigarettes for long.

    The expression have a cigarette is a special phrase meaning to smoke a cigarette. Perhaps this is why you can't say it with for long.
    Similar expressions are have a rest, have a fright, have a meal, none of which involve ownership.
     
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