''for'' and "by'' when use together, one after another

chichirico

New Member
Chinese
Hi, can somebody explain to me the use of the prepositions of ''for'' and ''by'' here?
The pension benefits you receive from this plan are paid for by contributions made by you and your employer.

Why can't we say:
The pension benefits you receive from this plan are paid by contributions made by you and your employer.

This is a sentence from my pension plan booklet about multi-sector pension plan.

Thank you !
 
  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    "To pay for something" is not the same as "to pay something".

    I pay for the spaghetti meal - the spaghetti meal is hereby paid for by me.
    I pay for an advertisement in the newspaper - the ad is paid for by me.
    I pay the money to a person - the money hereby is paid by me.
    I pay a person's salary - the person's salary is hereby paid by me.
    I pay the person (for a job) - the person is paid by me.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The active voice equivalent is (shortening it a bit):

    Your contributions pay for the benefits.

    'The benefits' are the object of the preposition 'for', which is in an idiom with 'pay'. A passive voice sentence can be made on the object of the preposition, which leaves 'for' at the end. After this you can optionally mention the original subject, which now has 'by':

    The benefits are paid for (by your contributions).

    So 'pay for', 'paid for' go together, but 'for' and 'by' are just next to each other by chance.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You have a passive construction,

    The pension benefits you receive from this plan are paid for by contributions - passive

    = The contributions pay for the pension benefits you receive from this plan - active

    In the passive, by introduces the object that was the subject when the sentence was in the active voice.

    Compare, "He pays the meal" :cross: and He pays for the meal" :tick: He pays the waiter for the meal. :tick:

    To pay takes
    (i) an indirect object (i.e. the meal) and introduces it by the preposition for or to (also called a prepositional object)
    (ii) an direct object (waiter) and indirect object (the meal)

    Also, "He bakes her a cake." indirect object
    "He bakes a cake for her." indirect object (also known as a prepositional object)
     

    chichirico

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thank you all for the answers! But how can I determine when to use pay for or pay?

    For example,

    I must pay my library fines.
    I had to pay the lawyers fee.

    She paid for dinner.
    Who paid the bill?

    Are library fees and lawyers fee direct objects? So why is ''dinner'' the indirect object? and the ''bill'' ?

    Thanks !
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    You pay an amount of money or a demand for money: you pay $10 or you pay a bill, a fine, or a fee.

    You pay for something you get: you pay for the dinner, your education, some legal services, or a new Ferrari.
     
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