For as well as I've done .., I don't want [For?]

stenka25

Senior Member
South Korea, Han-gul
The text below is from an article.

In this article, the meaning of the conjunction “for” is not clear to me. As a conjunction, most dictionaries suggests “for” only has one meaning, which is “because.” But in this text, I am not sure. Rather, it seems “although” to me.


Can you give me what “for” means?



There is something wrong with our value system that encourages people to aspire to those riches. But there's something more fundamentally wrong in our political and economic system that permits them to do so while the vast majority of people languish in poverty, or are barely keeping their heads above water after paying their taxes, their student debts, their rent and basic necessities.


And these flaws are even more glaring when the system is constructed in such a way as to privatise most of the wealth of the financial system in a tiny number of hands, and yet socialise its losses among ordinary working men and women.


For
as well as I've done out of the system, I don't want to live in a society with these values, which relies on such a heavily manipulated political economy to deliver such staggeringly unequal wealth.
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    In my opinion, there should be either a comma after "for" like this:

    For, as well as the system has treated me, I don't want to live in a society with these values, a society which relies on such a heavily manipulated political economy to deliver such staggeringly unequal wealth.

    Or the beginning of the sentence should be re-written like this:

    For - as well as the system has treated me - I don't want to live in a society with these values, a society which relies on such a heavily manipulated political economy to deliver such staggeringly unequal wealth.

    I also cleared up some of the other poorly-phrased elements of the sentence. Does that help?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    But it's right next to a phrase that implies "although" or "nevertheless," so some sort of better punctuation should be employed to rigorously separate the two opposed logical movements.
     

    stenka25

    Senior Member
    South Korea, Han-gul
    Thanks for answering me immediately.
    And I get the complete picture of "for."

    Thanks again.


    But in your answer, I found out another misunderstanding of a part of this sentence from me.

    In you explanation, "as well as the system has treated me" seems paraphrase of "as well as I've done out of the system."


    Am I right? If so, thanks a million for everything you’ve explained to me.
     
    Last edited:

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I don't like "as well as I've done out of the system." The writer is trying to say "as wealthy as I have become through my own involvement in the system." This could be said merely as "as well as I've done," but the writer wanted to put "the system" in there. But I really don't think "to do well out of X" is a phrase in English. It could be "as much as I've gotten out of the system," but I changed it to "as well as the system has treated me" to keep "as well."
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    A possible rephrasing, just for the sake of clarity, might be " For, although the system has treated/been treating me well, ... ...".

    Best.

    GS
     
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