For <being> talking to her

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Pollito solito.

Member
Spanish.
Hi all, please take a look ta the following sentences:

1.I couldn't see her for watching the game.

2.I couldn't see her for being watching the game.

Does the second sentence make sense?

Furthermore,does it mean or conveys the same idea as the firts one?

Thanks!
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I can't think of a context in which I would say 'for being watching.'

    It is a very odd phrase and difficult to understand. Among other things, it is unclear to me whether you or she is watching the game.
    In the first sentence, I understand that you are watching the game.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Welcome to the forum! :)
    Sadly, neither of your sentences is understandable. Please tell us the circumstances, the context, in which they would be used. Who is talking to whom?
    We'll do our best to help you when we have more details.
     

    Pollito solito.

    Member
    Spanish.
    Welcome to the forum! :)
    Sadly, neither of your sentences is understandable. Please tell us the circumstances, the context, in which they would be used. Who is talking to whom?
    We'll do our best to help you when we have more details.
    Hi Hermione, I might be interpreting this concept in the wrong way, but I think " I couldn't see her for watching the game" is the same as " I couldn't see her for I was watching the game" taking into account that "for " is being used as a conjunction to mean "because".

    I found this sentence in the Cambridge dictionary:
    1.I couldn't see for the tears in my eyes.

    As in the original sentence in the dictionary the word "for" is followed by a noun,I thought it was possible to use a verb instead of the noun.-

    1.I couldn't eat for doing my homework.

    As far as the second sentence, I just made it up thinking it was a possible way to convey the same idea as in the first one.

    But I'm actually not sure if either of the two is correct.

    Thanks a lot!
     
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