For / For the sake of

Rigardo Lee

Senior Member
Greetings, it's Ric here.


What difference can be possibly made by using 'for the sake of something'?

I do understand for and for the sake of both simply mean for, the latter one being a slightly more emphatic version.

Can you tell the difference for me on a nuance level, as much in detail as possible?



Context and Thoughts :

Take care of yourself for your baby.

Take care of yourself for the sake of your baby.

Please don't say there's no actual difference; two things that look different are supposed to have a difference, I think :)




Kindest regards,
Ric
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Take care of yourself for your baby. :thumbsdown: This one is too short and too laconic to be understandable at first glance.

    Take care of yourself for the sake of your baby. :thumbsup: Or for your baby's sake, even better.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Take care of yourself for your baby.

    Take care of yourself for the sake of your baby.

    Please don't say there's no actual difference; two things that look different are supposed to have a difference, I think :)
    I think the main difference is that I would never say the first sentence. "For" on its own does not convey the meaning of "on behalf of" or "for the benefit of" with "take care".
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I do understand for and for the sake of both simply mean for
    \Not necessarily. See this definition from the forum dictionary:

    sake n. 1 benefit or well-being: worked hard for the sake of her family

    If this just said "worked hard for her family" it wouldn't necessary mean "for the family's benefit" but could imply that she felt obliged to do so.
     
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