for memory vs as a memory

Joseph A

Senior Member
Kurdish
Hello everyone,
Is either "for" or "as" correct in the following sentences?
1. I would like to take a photo with you as a memory.
2. I would like to take a photo with for memory.
I think both are correct.
Regards,
Joseph
 
  • Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    Neither, because we don't use 'memory' this way. Maybe you're thinking of 'memento'?
    Thank you so much, london calling.
    Now are they okay?
    1. I would like to take a photo with you as a memento/souvenir.
    2. I would like to take a photo with for memento/souvenir.
    Regards,
    Joseph
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Sentence 1 is natural. You want the photo (an object) to be a memento/souvenir (an object), so you can use "as".

    "For" is followed by a purpose, not an object. You can't use sentence 2.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    1. is okay although not particularly idiomatic and I'd avoid using 'souvenir'. 2. doesn't work at all.
    Sentence 1 is natural. You want the photo (an object) to be a memento/souvenir (an object), so you can use "as".

    "For" is followed by a purpose, not an object. You can't use sentence 2.
    Excuse me london calling. I have one more question about this thread. If we change "photo" into 'photos', is "a memento" or "mementos" okay as follows?
    1. I would like to take some photos with you as a memento.
    2. I would like to take some photos as mementos.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    It sounds better but I hold to what I said in my earlier post.
    Thanks a lot.
    I remember that you said, "I would like to take some photos with you to remember you by.", but my recent question was about "a memento and mementos". Is either singular "a memento" or "mementos" okay if the preceding noun is plural? I mean the word "photos" is plural.
    I would like to take some photos with you as a memento/mementos.
    In my native language, both "a memento, and "mementos" are correct in the above sentence. I think they are correct too in English. Is it right?
    I'm sorry to be a bother.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In American English, "keepsake".

    From Merriam-Webster:

    keepsake
    noun

    keep·sake \ ˈkēp-ˌsāk


    Definition of keepsake



    : something kept or given to be kept as a memento
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It is very common to take photos, as a way of remembering a person or an event. Stores sell large books whose purpose is to hold these photos. The books are called "photo albums".

    Usually a "memento" (or "momento" or "keepsake" or "souvenir") is not a photograph. Those words are used for non-photo things we use to remember something. Photos are so common for remembering that we don't use a special word: we just call them photos (photographs). Is there any other purpose for a photo except to remember things?

    Every famous place and every resort has "gift shops" full of souvenirs/mementos: things with a symbol (and/or the name) of the famous place. They include small statues, key chains, T-shirts, post cards and other items.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would like a photo [of you] to remember you by.

    "...to remember you by" might sound odd to non-native speakers, but sounds perfectly colloquial to my American English ears.

    I guess it is another form of "by which to remember you..."
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    [/QUOTE]
    In American English, "keepsake".

    From Merriam-Webster:

    keepsake
    noun

    keep·sake \ ˈkēp-ˌsāk


    Definition of keepsake



    : something kept or given to be kept as a memento
    Thanks a lot, Packard.
    Does "keepsake" have the same usage as "souvenir" or "memento"? I mean does it need "a" as follows?
    I would like to take a picture as a keepsake.
    It is very common to take photos, as a way of remembering a person or an event. Stores sell large books whose purpose is to hold these photos. The books are called "photo albums".

    Usually a "memento" (or "momento" or "keepsake" or "souvenir") is not a photograph. Those words are used for non-photo things we use to remember something. Photos are so common for remembering that we don't use a special word: we just call them photos (photographs). Is there any other purpose for a photo except to remember things?

    Every famous place and every resort has "gift shops" full of souvenirs/mementos: things with a symbol (and/or the name) of the famous place. They include small statues, key chains, T-shirts, post cards and other items.
    Thanks a lot.
    The grammar of this sentence is correct, whether you use "as a memento" or "as mementos".
    Thanks a lot, dojibear.
    I would like a photo [of you] to remember you by.

    "...to remember you by" might sound odd to non-native speakers, but sounds perfectly colloquial to my American English ears.

    I guess it is another form of "by which to remember you..."
    Thanks a lot.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks a lot, Packard.
    I meant the usage of the word. I know they are synonymous because you taught me. I think it needs an article or it neexs to be pluralized like "a memento or mementos" in sentences. I meant this point. Is it right? I'm sorry to bother you.
    Yes, you would want "a keepsake". Use the indefinite article.
     
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