For men diagnosed with prostate cancer after a PSA test, the ratio is 47 to one

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "47 to one" mean "in 47 people who received PSA test, there is one of them who suffers prostate cancer"?

<-----Additional question removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Thanks in advance
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But tests often do more harm than good. For every woman whose life is extended because a mammogram detected a tumor, up to 33 receive unnecessary treatment, including biopsies, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. For men diagnosed with prostate cancer after a PSA test, the ratio is 47 to one. Similar data are emerging on colonoscopies and other tests.
-Scientific American
Source
 
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  • joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    No, it's a comparison with the previous sentence about unnecessary treatment for breast cancer.
    For men diagnosed with prostate cancer after a PSA test, up to 47 receive unnecessary treatment (for every one with cancer).
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Suppose 1,000 men are given a PSA test. Of those, 48 test positive. That is, the test says 48 of them have prostate cancer. All 48 are treated. However, only one of them really has prostate cancer. The other 47 have was are called "false positives" on the test: a positive result but no disease.

    The point, some feel, is that treatment has risks. The harm of treating 47 people unnecessarily may be greater than the benefit of curing one person's cancer.
     

    passengerman

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "For every woman whose life is extended... "

    It's a deficient sentence ? I guess "for every woman" is not a subject. Could we omit "for" ?
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    Suppose 1,000 men are given a PSA test. Of those, 48 test positive. That is, the test says 48 of them have prostate cancer. All 48 are treated. However, only one of them really has prostate cancer. The other 47 have was are called "false positives" on the test: a positive result but no disease.

    The point, some feel, is that treatment has risks. The harm of treating 47 people unnecessarily may be greater than the benefit of curing one person's cancer.
    It's not that the 47 cases of PSA-verified prostate cancer are false, the men have a prostate cancer but it's not a cancer that will kill them even if they don't get any treatment for it, as most prostate cancers are relatively "benign" when it comes to different types of cancer. Most men with a prostate cancer will die of something else bofore the cancer gets deadly. The difficulty with PSA test results is to differentiate between those men with a aggressive prostate cancer that needs to be treated and those with a slow-growing cancer that doesn't need treatment. So for 47 of the diagnosed men, getting treatment won't add years to their lives as they will die of something else than prostate cancer.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "For every woman whose life is extended... "

    It's a deficient sentence ? I guess "for every woman" is not a subject. Could we omit "for" ?
    That is a phrase, not a whole sentence. It is a small part of a sentence. There is no main verb, and there is no subject. You should not try to change it into a sentence by omitting "for".

    For every woman whose life is extended because a mammogram detected a tumor, up to 33 receive unnecessary treatment, including biopsies, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.
    That is the actual sentence. The main verb is "receive" and its subject is "up to 33 (women)".

    We can simplify this sentence, to make it simple enough that its structure is clear:

    "For every woman who wins, 33 lose."

    In this simple form, it is easy to see that the first part (from "For" to the comma) is a clause, not a sentence.
     
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