for nature, at least, has stamped her patent of nobility on this brow, Jane

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 24

Quotation: “I will myself put the diamond chain round your neck, and the circlet on your forehead,—which it will become: for nature, at least, has stamped her patent of nobility on this brow, Jane; and I will clasp the bracelets on these fine wrists, and load these fairy-like fingers with rings.”

“No, no, sir! think of other subjects, and speak of other things, and in another strain. Don’t address me as if I were a beauty; I am your plain, Quakerish governess.”
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

for => as in my thread for a sanctum it was now become to me
It's that awkward conjunction "for" again, Irelia....

I think it's easiest to 'translate' it, not as "because", but as "and indeed": and indeed the schoolroom had now become a sanctum to me.
To stamp her patent of => to grant a patent to; to admit to some privilege or rank by letters patent
The whole sentence => indeed, nature, at least, has grant nobility to this brow (=forehead)
 
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