... for or as ...

Wookie

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
The employee’s manager must approve, in writing, any outside or consulting activity for or as a vendor, a supplier of goods or services, a customer or partner of ABC Limited.

This is from a business policty.
I have problem understanding the underlined part.
I'd like to know if the part means i) or ii).

i)
... any outside or consulting activity for ABC Limited
... any outside or consulting activity as a vendor, a supplier of goods or services, a customer or partner of ABC Limited.

ii)
... any outside or consulting activity for a vendor, a supplier of goods or services, a customer or partner of ABC Limited.
... any outside or consulting activty as a vendor, a supplier of goods or services, a customer or partner of ABC Limited.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is the way I read it:
    ABC Limited employees must receive written approval from their manager before they engage in any outside or consulting activity for any ABC Limited vendor, supplier, customer or partner.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hmm ...

    I see read it as Wookie does in his option ii. I might have punctuated it differently:
    ... any outside or consulting activity for (or as) a vendor, ....
    The two possibilities being considered are:
    that he might be employed by someone outside the company as a vendor, etc,

    or that he might be employed by a vendor etc, outside the company.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I chose to rephrase because I read option ii as an either/or choice, which didn't make sense. But you're suggesting he meant both... which I find even more confusing.

    I guess the first question that should be answered (for me) is whether or not it is ABC Limited writing this statement.

    To create the most confusing example from option ii, this could be said:
    Acme Universal employees must have their manager’s approval for any consulting activity as a customer of ABC Limited.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I was assuming that this is the company rule, and it is intended to allow the company to keep tabs on any work their employees do for any other company, to be certain that they don't work for a competitor, or do something that might in some other way be contrary to the interests of the company.

    The construction is not easy to read. I happen to be inclined to use it, but I think that actually it is better avoided.

    I wanted to use ewie's swing-dashes, but I was trying to stick to conventional punctuation. Would this be easier to understand?
    I have been studying magic. I will take any job I can get working as ~ or, for ~ a magician.
    = I will take any job I can get working as a magician. + I will take any job I can get working for a magician.​
    (Not a great example, but it's late here.)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It works for a magician, but for the other... I will have to think about it. I'm hoping Wookie clarifies before breakfast. :)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, well, my system breaks down when we get toa customer or partner of ABC Limited.
    working for a customer, for a partner is okay.
    but:
    working as a customer, as a partner?
    On the other hand, I can think of no other way making sense of the first part.
     
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