For or at

Oros

Senior Member
Korean
He worked for a rubber factory

He worked at a rubber factory.

What is the correct one?
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Oros said:
    He worked for a rubber factory

    He worked at a rubber factory.

    What is the correct one?
    at is correct -you can't say for here.

    You can equally say in.

    You work for a person or a business. So "he worked for "brian's cement works Limited" in a factory".
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello
    In this context means 'at' means a place or some other meaning to this effect.

    When you say he worked at Morrisons, I must understand that the place he works is Morrisons. In town, there are lot of shops but he works at Morrisons.

    This is not the meaning that you and I wanted to convey to the others. There is a company called Morrisons. He worked in that company. He gets a salary from the company. The salary he earns from the job helps to feed the family or rather eaks out a living.

    So I would vote for the prepositon 'for' in the given circumstances.

    Others could argue otherwise.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Don't really understand what you mean I'm afraid.

    At the end of the day you work for a person or a company (eg for John Smith or for Morissons).

    You work in or at a shop/factory/warehouse etc (which was the example you gave originally).

    Regards
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Let us say you are working today. The name of the company you work is Samson Electronics.

    You are receiving a salary at the end of the month. Those money you receive helps to buy your food and other expenses.

    So you are working for Samson Electronics. I must always say that you are working for Samson Electronics.



    If I say that you are working at Samson Electronics, it merely means I just say the place you are working.
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Being asked what he's doing for a living an employee working in the rubber factory mentioned in your previous post might reply: "I'm with Morrisons," and would add to be more specific: "I'm working at the factory in .....street.", thus referring to the concrete place.

    On the other hand "I am working for Morrisons Rubber Ltd." would answer the question about his employer. So it dependes on what kind of information you want to 'convey'. "Working for a factory" sounds indeed a bit strange.

    Cheers.
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English, French, Russian
    Oros said:
    He worked for a rubber factory

    He worked at a rubber factory.

    What is the correct one?
    It completely depends on the context. If I am a freelancer and did some work for the factory, I would say that I worked "for" the factory. Saying "at" suggests that one goes to the physical building each day to complete his job.

    For a very large company with buildings or plants at various locations, I would generally use "for."
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    So Modgirl toe the line with me.



    Ralf, I respect to your opinon.

    If you worked there for about 5 or 10 years ago, you would say, I worked for the rubber factory, wouldn't you?

    I myself worked for a food processing plant some years ago.

    Today I am used to saying ' I worked for Dikan.' The name of the company is Dikan.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Oros said:
    He worked for a rubber factory

    He worked at a rubber factory.

    What is the correct one?

    Both are correct and both have different meanings.

    The first one means that he works in order to make that rubber factory earn money, so he contributes with his work to help the factory get its aim. :arrow: For: implies purpose

    The second one, means that he works in that place. :arrow: At: implies place, situation.


    Bye Oros!!! :p :) ;)
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English, French, Russian
    Oros said:
    So Modgirl toe the line with me.
    Hmmmm....interesting choice of words!


    If you worked there for about 5 or 10 years ago, you would say, I worked for the rubber factory, wouldn't you?

    I would.

    Today I am used to saying ' I worked for Dikan.' The name of the company is Dikan.

    That meaning is very clear to me.
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Artrelia

    I beg to differ.

    Let us say that you worked for Robert.

    Here Robert is the name of the company as well as the owner of the company. We would assume this company is a small one; just 5 people are working in the company.

    You worked there some years ago.

    Today you could say ' I worked for Robert'.

    Does it mean that you worked there so as to Mr Robert and the company Robert earns money?

    It means that you worked there to get some money/salary. You lived thanks to the money you received from that company, then.



    Now you may be working for Paradise. [ Paradise is a fictious name for a company.]

    I work for Paradise. This means you live on the money you receive today from the company. It may be salary or some other form of payment.


    [ It seems you speak fluent Spanish. My Spanish is beneath contempt.]
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Let us say that you worked for Robert.

    Here Robert is the name of the company as well as the owner of the company. We would assume this company is a small one; just 5 people are working in the company.
    OR, it could mean that Robert is the name of your boss. You may work at a large company, but the person who gives you tasks to do is named Robert.

    There are at least three possible meanings:
    I work for Roberts. (person, name of your supervisor/boss)
    I work for Roberts. (person, name of owner of the company)
    I work for Roberts. (company name)
    Using "at" instead of "for" only allows for the last possibility. "I work at Roberts." tells you that the company is named Roberts. It is not talking about the name of a person.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    modgirl said:
    Hmmmm....interesting choice of words!


    If you worked there for about 5 or 10 years ago, you would say, I worked for the rubber factory, wouldn't you?

    This is different from your original question. This is fine because you say "the factory" not "a factory".

    Here you are implying that "the factory" is seen as the whole business and so you are working for that business.

    It is not so normal to say "I work for a rubber factory" which was your question.QUOTE]
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    mjscott said:
    "I work for a rubber factory," answers the question, For whom do you work?
    "I work at a rubber factory," answers the question, Where do you work?

    Both are correct.
    Mjscott. Thank you !! This hits the nail on the head.
     
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