For someone that vs for someone to do

Curiosity777

Senior Member
Korean
I would like to know what's the difference in meaning between

1.For children that lost their parents, it could be difficult to mingle with classmates.
2.For children to lose their parents, it could be difficult to mingle with classmates.
3.For children to have lost their parents, it could be difficult to mingle with classmates.

To me, there's no difference at all.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Only the first sentence looks close to being sensible to me, Curiosity. With a slight change in verb tenses, it makes sense as a remark about kids who were possibly having trouble mingling with their classmates: For children who had lost their parents, it could be difficult to mingle with their classmates. I also changed the relative pronoun from "that" to "who" in my version of your sentence.

    I'm not sure what the other two sentences mean.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top