for stories OF and introduction TO

teacup2

Senior Member
Finnish
Hello!

I´ve been wondering for quite a while whether to use both particles if the nouns in the sentence "demand" different particles.

I have two examples:
1a. "For stories of and introduction to women´s history, please refer to..."

2a. "There have been many interpretations on the origins of and the reasons for the Russian Revolution."

Would it be grammatically correct to omit the first particle (the context being academic text) and write:

1b. "For stories and introduction to women´s history, please refer to..."

2b. "There have been many interpretations on the origins and (the) reasons for the Russian Revolution."
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    No, you definitely have to use all of the correct prepositions. You're doing it right in 1a and 2a - eliding any one of the particles is wrong.

    That being said, there are also a few problems with 1a and 2a:

    1a. "For stories of and an introduction to women´s history, please refer to..."

    2a. "There have been many interpretations of the origins of and the reasons for the Russian Revolution."
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    They are required, but using them often sounds awkward - you may have to hesitate and be careful in pronunciation, for one thing, and they may be difficult to understand straight away in writing. Stylistically, I would advise avoiding such situations. But sometimes of course you can't.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    They aren't too uncommon in academic texts, in which authors often try to cover a lot of ground in every sentence by chaining together long lists of noun phrases (or clauses). In fact, some people think these kinds of sentences help the reader by being overtly schematic. In my own opinion, these are situations to be avoided (i.e. by changing the first sentence to "For an introduction to women's history that includes personal stories and perspectives..."). But whatever your viewpoint, all of the correct prepositions have to be in there!
     
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