for students to become relaxed in class

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abcde1996

Member
Chinese(Mandarin as well as Wu-chinese)
"In a sense, for students to become relaxed in class, it helps if they look upon the teacher as a parent and themselves as a child."
Source:"Active Skills for Reading book 3"
This sentence is from a passage which talks about a teaching method.


I don't quite understand the meaning of "for students to become relaxed in class". At first I thought it means "in order to make students become relaxed in class", but then I found that I was wrong, because the main part of this sentence is "it helps if ...", and obviously "in order to make students ..." is not the purpose of "it helps ...".
Then I think it may mean "for the students who want to become relaxed in class", but this interpretation seems wrong too, because the whole passage is talking about a teaching method, and the passage was not written for the students who want to become relaxed in class but the teachers who want to make their students become relaxed in class. Now I am totally confused by this expression.:confused:
I really want to ask: what does this expression mean?
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "In a sense, [in order]for students to become relaxed in class, it helps if they look upon the teacher as a parent and themselves as a child."
    Source:"...
    There is a part of the sentence that is "understood" and is left out. I have inserted it above in red..
     

    abcde1996

    Member
    Chinese(Mandarin as well as Wu-chinese)
    Well, I think this interpretation has some problems. As I have pointed out, "in order for students to become ..." is not the purpose of the main part of this sentence---"it helps ...".
    I might say "I
    n order for students to become..., they should look upon their teacher....", but I won't say "In order for students to become..., their looking upon the teacher... will help".
    Or maybe my thinking is wrong.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Well, I think this interpretation has some problems. As I have pointed out, "in order for students to become ..." is not the purpose of the main part of this sentence---"it helps ...".
    I might say "I
    n order for students to become..., they should look upon their teacher....", but I won't say "In order for students to become..., their looking upon the teacher... will help".
    Or maybe my thinking is wrong.
    I believe my interpretation is correct. Let's wait for some other replies.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Packard's interpretation.

    Perhaps it will become clearer to you if the order of the elements of the sentence are reversed: If students look upon the teacher as a parent and themselves as a child, they will become relaxed in class. Do you see that how the students look upon the teacher and themselves will (at least in the writer's opinion) lead to their becoming relaxed? And that they would do this in order to become relaxed?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Packard is right to see "in order" understood there. I think "for students to become relaxed in class" is a loose way of saying "if we want students to become relaxed in class..." or "[in order] to make students relaxed in class..."
     
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