For the conversation with you, I am really happy.

Jawel7

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello everyone.
In my last post, I asked a question related to the sentence "To study at mathematics, I was really eager..." and native speakers stated that it was grammatically wrong.
Then, I came across some sentences re-ordered like the following one.

1-) For the conversation with you, I was really happy.

What I learned from some of members in this forum, 1 should be wrong grammatically.
The correct ones may be:
- I was really happy for the conversation with you.
or
- I was really happy to have a conversation with you.

What do you think? Is 1 really wrong grammatically?(If "to study at mathematics, I was really eager" is wrong, 1 must be wrong as well, I think..)
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I was really happy to have [had] a conversation with you. :tick:

    "For the conversation with you, I was really happy" isn't something we would say.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The normal way to emphasize part of a sentence in English is by means of intonation. In writing, you can highlight words to provide a written clue as to how the intonation should work. This means that it is not normally necessary to change the word order from the normal word order: the familiar is easier to understand than the unfamiliar.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    We also wouldn't say 'happy for the conversation with you', so it doesn't contain a part that could be fronted like that.

    'Eager to' is closely connected; that's partly the reason it can't be separated by fronting the 'to'-phrase.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    We also wouldn't say 'happy for the conversation with you', so it doesn't contain a part that could be fronted like that.

    'Eager to' is closely connected; that's partly the reason it can't be separated by fronting the 'to'-phrase.
    Does "eager" get connected to a prepositional phrase as well?
    Would "for mathematics, I was eager" be grammatically wrong as well?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Would "for mathematics, I was eager" be grammatically wrong as well?
    I have tried and failed to imagine a context, no matter how unusual, in which someone might say or write this sentence. The reason why it sounds strange is the one I gave in #3. Does that make it “grammatically wrong”?
     
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