for the price of one piece of cake

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jhonyps

New Member
Portuguese - Brazil
In Brazil it is very common to say something like "See this car! It's at the price of bananas."
Which means the car is very cheap.

Now consider the following phrase, which I found in the Cambridge online dictionary.

Now, suppose I can buy room in a fridge overnight for the price of one piece of cake.

Is it common to use the expression "for the price of one piece of cake" to refer to something very cheap? Or what expression is most frequently used in English?
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    No, not as far as I know. I suppose I use 'peanuts' to mean very cheap.

    "I was surprised to find out that it costs peanuts to change your name."
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've thought about this a bit more.

    "For the price of one piece of cake" is not a set expression, and I would say that it's not common (I had never seen it before), but it works in the post 1 sentence. I would advise learners not to use this expression, despite the fact that it appears in an online dictionary.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I took it to mean a real piece of cake, as a thank-you. Anyway, I agree with you and would add that a 'piece of cake' does exist as an expression meaning 'very easy'.

    -How was the exam?
    -A piece of cake!
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    We also have "cheap as chips" in Britain.
    Now, suppose I can buy room in a fridge overnight for the price of one piece of cake.
    It could be meant literally. If you give me a piece of that cake, I'll let you keep your milk in my fridge tonight.

    Where did you see this in the Cambridge online dictionary? What was it being used to illustrate?
    In any case, it is a very unusual sentence; who needs to buy overnight space in a fridge? I had thought "fridge" was a metaphor, but the absence of an article with "room" suggests not.
     

    jhonyps

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    We also have "cheap as chips" in Britain.

    It could be meant literally. If you give me a piece of that cake, I'll let you keep your milk in my fridge tonight.

    Where did you see this in the Cambridge online dictionary? What was it being used to illustrate?
    In any case, it is a very unusual sentence; who needs to buy overnight space in a fridge? I had thought "fridge" was a metaphor, but the absence of an article with "room" suggests not.
    I agree with you that it's an unusual sentence.
    Unfortunately the phrase is not inserted in a context. They used the phrase just to exemplify the use of the word 'fridge'.

    You can check my previous post about the meaning of "buy romm in a fridge". There you can see the link for the dictionary too: "buy room in a fridge" ?
     

    jhonyps

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I took it to mean a real piece of cake, as a thank-you. Anyway, I agree with you and would add that a 'piece of cake' does exist as an expression meaning 'very easy'.

    -How was the exam?
    -A piece of cake!
    We also have "cheap as chips" in Britain.

    It could be meant literally. If you give me a piece of that cake, I'll let you keep your milk in my fridge tonight.

    Where did you see this in the Cambridge online dictionary? What was it being used to illustrate?
    In any case, it is a very unusual sentence; who needs to buy overnight space in a fridge? I had thought "fridge" was a metaphor, but the absence of an article with "room" suggests not.
    The literal meaning makes sense. I had thought it could mean the average value of a slice of cake. Although I do not know how much this could be. ($1, $5, $10...)
     

    jhonyps

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I've thought about this a bit more.

    "For the price of one piece of cake" is not a set expression, and I would say that it's not common (I had never seen it before), but it works in the post 1 sentence. I would advise learners not to use this expression, despite the fact that it appears in an online dictionary.
    Yes it is difficult to know the real meaning without a context ... My doubt was to understand if it is an common expression.
     
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