for the purpose of the Yard working on (it)?

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Baltic Sea

Banned
Polish
Hello users!

This morning a workmate of mine asked me to translate a sentence from Polish into English for him. The sentence reads as follows: "Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull in order that the Yard could work on it (the hull, of course)". The same sentence could be expressed as follows: "Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull in order for the Yard to work on (it)".
Is it possible to say: "Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull for the purpose of the Yard working on (it)"?

Thank you. The source: The workmate of mine asked me to translate the sentence from Polish into English for him.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I sure wouldn't understand your last sentence without the elaborate explanation in your post, Baltic Sea. Although it seems obvious to you that the Yard will work on the hull and not the scaffolding, I think many readers or listeners would be confused. I suggest that you find another way to express the idea.

    The sentence would be even more confusing to me if you omitted the final "it".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi BS

    Here are my reactions:

    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull in order that the Yard could work on it.:tick:
    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull in order for the Yard to work on it.:tick:
    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull in order for the Yard to work on.:cross:
    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull for the Yard to work on.:tick:
    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull for the purpose of the Yard working on it.
    :cross:
    Scaffolding was to be erected near the ship's hull for the purpose of the Yard working on.
    :cross:

    (Edit: in the grey sentence, the meaning is definitely that the men would be working on the scaffolding.)
     
    Last edited:

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you very much for your helpful and exhaustive replies. Since structures like "I have nothing against your doing it" or "I do not mind your doing it" are commonly used in English, I thought to myself that the structure "..... for the purpose of somebody doing something" is also possible to use, understandable and acceptable to native speakers.
     
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