for the sake of=because of?

Lucy 234

Senior Member
Korean
"Hello, everyone,
Does "for the sake of" equal to "because of" in the following sentence. Thank you!
"For the sake of her daughter’s inability to bear a child, She looked everywhere for doctors, but ended up in failure."
(Note: This is a sentence I wrote myself.)
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It's an inappropriate use of "For the sake of", though it's clear that the intended meaning is "Because of".

    If you want to use that expression, I suggest something like: She tried hard to find a suitable doctor for her daughter's sake...

    "For [something]'s sake" usually means "For the benefit of [something]" while "For the sake of [something]" usually means "For the purpose of [something]" or "To achieve [something]". (This may not be a rule however.)
     

    Lucy 234

    Senior Member
    Korean
    But I find the following sentences in the cambridge dictionary:
    Let's not disagree for the sake of (= because of) a few dollars.
    Let's say, just for the sake of argument/for argument's sake (= for the purposeof this discussion), that prices rise by three percent this year.
    You're only arguing for the sake of arguing (= because you like arguing).

    So I am still a bit confused?
    [Successive posts merged to prevent 'bumping'. DonnyB - moderator]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Let's not disagree for the sake of (= because of) a few dollars.
    "Because of" here doesn't mean that the few dollars directly led to the disagreement, the way that a daughter's medical condition might lead to her mother looking around for doctors.

    In your original sentence, there is a clear cause-and-effect relationship. A woman's daughter had a certain medical condition (cause). This led to the woman looking around for doctors (effect). "For the sake of" isn't used in such sentences.

    In the sentence Let's not disagree for the sake of a few dollars, there is no such cause-and-effect. This sentence means:
    Let's not disagree over a few dollars.
    Let's not disagree just because one of us is willing to spend a few dollars more while the other isn't.

    "For the sake of" does mean "because of" in this sentence but in this sentence, "because of" is to be interpreted as "in connection with" or "on the basis of".
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top