for the sake of completion

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
I've come across "for the sake of completion" on a forum. It seems that it's okay to use it for movie sequels/ the latest edition of a series. But how about the first in a series? Suppose I've only read book 2 and book 3, is it fine to say "for the sake of completion, I'm going to read book 1"? Here I wrote two more similar sentences to see if it makes sense to you.

Even though the reviews were predominantly negative, I decided to buy the first edition of the series for the sake of completion

At first, I went to watch the first movie for completion's sake, but once I got to the point where the main character was shot by his friend, I was hooked and couldn't tear my eyes off the screen until it was finished.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'd say "completeness" here. "Completion," to me, means that you started something but haven't finished yet, so the end is missing. If something is incomplete, any part of it can be missing.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Suppose I've only read book 2 and book 3, is it fine to say "for the sake of completion, I'm going to read book 1"? It is as if you are collecting the books and wish to have a complete set, hence you will read the one you have not read. In this sense, the order of reading them is not important.

    Egmont's completeness is far better than completion.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I think this is an example of "being a completist." "Completeness" is better, but if you want to be simple and precise, just say "Because I'm a completist, I'm going to read book 1."
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thanks Egmont, lucas and PaulQ~~
    If it takes three books to play out the whole story, and for some reason I've only read the second and the third books, is completeness still far better in "I'm going to read the first book for the sake of completeness "?

    And also, it sounds to me that making a point to say "do something for sake of completeness" often implies that the thing falls short of the previous greatness. Do you only use it in that way?
     
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