for what it's worth / needless to say

PULPANKER

Senior Member
Indonesian
I'm having trouble understanding the difference between 'for what it's worth' and 'needless to say'.

Here's my sentence:

___________, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia.


What best fits the sentence? I'm just in two minds about it.

I'd appreciate your help.
:)
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    They do mean quite different things, although they could both be used in a fairly meaningless way, as a bit of unimportant padding to introduce the main point about his fame / skill.

    If you want it to "mean" something you have to choose which meaning fits best. Before I try to distinguish the meanings I need to now this:
    What is your context for talking about this guitarist, is it to be spoken out loud or written in a text, if so, what sort of text?
     

    2tongdog

    New Member
    english, uk
    I'm having trouble understanding the difference between 'for what it's worth' and 'needless to say'.

    Here's my sentence:

    ___________, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia.


    What best fits the sentence? I'm just in two minds about it.

    I'd appreciate your help.
    :)
    "Needless to say" fits best.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    "Needless to say" fits best.
    Sorry, but how do you know that? There are contexts in which the other one fits best!
    It entirely depends on what the OP is trying to convey. I have asked the OP for more context, in lines with the forum rules.
     
    Last edited:

    2tongdog

    New Member
    english, uk
    Well,
    Here's the sentence:

    ___________, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia.

    The writer is talking about a guitarist and he is male. The writer wants to know what fits best, 'for what it's worth' and 'needless to say'.
    You don't need to know any more context, out of the two suggested solutions, 'needless to say'. Fits best.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think I agree with suzi that we need to know the context. "For what it's worth" is colloquial/casual and isn't suitable for all purposes - in formal written English for example.
    The subject-matter doesn't necessarily tell us where and how the sentence is going to be used.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Well,
    Here's the sentence:

    ___________, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia.

    The writer is talking about a guitarist and he is male. The writer wants to know what fits best, 'for what it's worth' and 'needless to say'.
    You don't need to know any more context, out of the two suggested solutions, 'needless to say'. Fits best.
    Frankly, nonesense. The two things mean different things. You do not know what the OP's intention is. You might be right, and needless to say might fit his needs best .... but that is not certain because the OP might have a reason for asking about "for what it's worth" which has prompted his enquiry.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree completely with Suzi. Depending on what thought Pulpanker wants to express, one of the two phrases mentioned may be right—or perhaps neither! We do need to know what's intended.
     

    Cynthia M.

    Senior Member
    English- United States
    I agree that you can't be sure which expression will fit without more context.

    "Needless to say, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia." This might be said if his success, records sold, recognized excellence were such that it obviously followed that he would be so famous.

    "For what it's worth, he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia." A negative assessment, meaning that although he is the single most famous guitarist in Indonesia, this doesn't amount to much because Indonesians might not care that much about guitar music (I don't know if this is true), being a famous guitarist just in Indonesia is a limited sort of fame from the international standpoint, and so on.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It's like asking whether it's better to put "However" or "Naturally" in that blank. They are both valid choices, but they just mean completely different things -- how should anybody know what it is that you're trying to express?
     

    PULPANKER

    Senior Member
    Indonesian
    Thank you all teachers,

    In Indonesia we have a very famous guitarist, everyone knows him. We talked about him that he would be the judge for the next Flying With Ibanez Guitar Competetion. At some point of the talk I came to this sentence, "needless to say, he is the single most famous guitarist in our country", but only after the talk was over I came to realize if I had used the phrase 'needless to say' correctly. I start to think if 'for what it's worth' fits better than 'needless to say' in that sentence.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It seems to me that if he's so famous that everyone knows him, and he's being discussed as a possible judge for a guitar competition, the sentence would probably start: "Well, of course he's the most famous guitarist in our country, . . . ".
     
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