forcing one's way aboard

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
board
to attack (a ship) by forcing one's way aboard

boarder
a person who boards a ship, esp one who forces his way aboard in an attack
Collins dictionary

Forcing one's way aboard -- how do I understand this?
Thank you
 
  • George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    board
    to attack (a ship) by forcing one's way aboard

    boarder
    a person who boards a ship, esp one who forces his way aboard in an attack
    Collins dictionary

    Forcing one's way aboard -- how do I understand this?
    Thank you
    One, the boarder, walks up the gangplank and then thumps the person standing at the top of the gangway. This poor chap is then in no state to stop the boarder from boarding the ship.

    GF..

    The boarder has forced himself onto the ship... He has attacked the ship's crew and the ship..
     
    Last edited:

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    "to force one's way aboard" means "to move forward by using force to pass people (moving them aside, killing them when they are in your way, etc.) and try to get aboard"

    (cross-posted with GF)
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    board
    to attack (a ship) by forcing one's way aboard

    boarder
    a person who boards a ship, esp one who forces his way aboard in an attack
    Collins dictionary

    Forcing one's way aboard -- how do I understand this?
    Thank you
    Understand it those ways only in cases where physical force (usually armed force) is used to get aboard a ship -- as, for instance, was done by the pirates in the waters off Somalia.

    Otherwise, the boarding of a ship by a boarder has no connotation of force or violence; it's just what ordinary people do when they are going for a cruise, for example.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Otherwise, the boarding of a ship by a boarder has no connotation of force or violence; it's just what ordinary people do when they are going for a cruise, for example.
    I don't think we call cruise passengers "boarders", MuttQuad. I have heard the verbs used "board/embark, disembark" when giving instructions but I think it would be very rare to find a case where boarder meant anything other than someone who was unwelcome on board.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    I am going to board at Dover, but there will be additional boarders at Le Havre. I do agree, thorough, that hostility is often implied.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think "boarders" would be avoided, in my experience, even in that sentence.


    "I am going to board to Dover but there will be additional passengers boarding at Le Havre."
     
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