Forget-me-not (myosotis)

clamor

Senior Member
French - France
Hi :)
I wondered in which languages forget-me-not or a similar term means myosotis.
In German Vergissmeinnicht has the same meaning, and Armenian Անմոռուկ (anmorruk) is related.

What about your language?
 
  • Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan,

    nomoblidis ('not-me-forget') exists and figures in the official dictionaries but it does not seem to be a traditional name and often the more 'technical' miosotis is preferred. If I'm not wrong, the origin of the "forget me not" expression in all languages is a rather recent calque from German, so that'd explain why it's not a traditional name.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech we do not use the Latin-Greek term Myosotis.

    Pomněnka lesní (Myosotis sylvatica), commonly pomněnka;

    fem. noun pomněnka from imper. pomni! or nezapomeň!= don't forget!
    adj. lesní = of the wood;
     
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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    In French, the usual name (the only one I knew anyway) is "myositis".
    But you can supposedly say "oreille-de-souris" (literally "mouse's ear") (never heard that, but I don't know much about flowers).
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, the usual name (the only one I knew anyway) is "myositis".
    "myosotis"

    Le myosotis, et puis la rose,
    Ce sont des fleurs qui disent quequ' chose

    (Mouloudji)

    But you can supposedly say "oreille-de-souris" (literally "mouse's ear") (never heard that, but I don't know much about flowers)
    The Greek etymology of myosotis (myos-otis) is indeed literally "mouse ear" as the shape of its leaves indicates:
    Myosotis arvensis - Wikimedia Commons

    I wondered in which languages forget-me-not or a similar term means myosotis.
    In French, the nickname of myosotis is indeed "ne m'oubliez pas" (don't forget me), but it's rather a nickname than a name.
     
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    Aliph

    Senior Member
    Italian (North)
    In French, the usual name (the only one I knew anyway) is "myositis".
    But you can supposedly say "oreille-de-souris" (literally "mouse's ear") (never heard that, but I don't know much about flowers).
    Myositis in French means an inflammatory disease of the muscles and not a flower. The usual name of the flower is myosotis. Or am I totally wrong?
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    In Finnish it is lemmikki, from the verb lempiä "to love". Lemmikki also means "favourite" and "pet animal".
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    In Romanian: nu-mă-uita (don't forget me) is the common name of the plant miozitis, also called as regionalisms: little bird's eyes / snake's eye / mouse's ear

    floare de nu-mă-uita = the flower of the (plant) don't-forget-me (this is the way of saying when we refer to the flower)

    Miozitis /miosotis / miozot (< fr. myosotis, cf. lat., gr. myosotis < gr. mys, myos – mouse, ous, otos – ear) - the scientific name of the plant don't forget me

    In Finnish it is lemmikki, from the verb lempiä "to love"
    Could it be lemmikki the equivalent of my love / mon amour / mon amor as an appelative ?
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Lemmikki isn't really used like that, but perhaps it was in the past, I don't know. A common expression is koko kansan lemmikki "lemmikki of the whole people", that is, someone/something loved by the whole people, someone/something very popular, for example an artist.
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Lemmikki isn't really used like that, but perhaps it was in the past, I don't know. A common expression is koko kansan lemmikki "lemmikki of the whole people", that is, someone/something loved by the whole people, someone/something very popular, for example an artist.
    Thank you ! :)
     
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