Forgetting answer is <easy over> forgetting some person

< Previous | Next >

Man_from_India

Senior Member
India
I know what these sentences mean. I also know what "over" means here.
But I still want to know the meaning of "over"; this meaning is listed in dictionary?

1. He choose silver over gold.
2. Forgetting answer in an exam hall is easy over forgetting some person in life.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sentence 1: If you look at Merriam-Webster online, it's definition 2b of the preposition form of over:

    b —used as a function word to indicate superiority, advantage, or preference <a big lead over the others>
    Edit: Also Definition 2 in the Wordreference dictionary (bolding is mine):
    2 at a higher level or layer than.
    ■ expressing authority or control.
    expressing preference.
    Sentence 2 is something similar, I suppose, although this use of over is not something I've often heard, if ever.
     

    nickm70

    Senior Member
    American English
    Instead of/in place of. In the first sentence it means he chose silver for a certain advantage it has (cheaper maybe), and in the second it's saying that forgetting an answer is much easier than forgetting "some person".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Does the use of "over" in the second sentence sounds natural?
    Not to me. "Over" usually expresses preferences, the meaning nickm70 explains in his discussion of sentence #1.

    The second sentence requires a simple comparison. I would expect something like "is easier than forgetting ...."
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    Forgetting something is easier than something. So forgetting the first has an advantage, and that's why it's easy. Is not it?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top