form / grade

< Previous | Next >

Xander2024

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

As far as I know, the word "a form" is used to denote a class or a year in a school in GB, while it's called "a grade" in the US. My question is: is the word "grade" ever used in Great Britain in this sense and which word do they use in Australia and New Zealand and Canada?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I believe in Australia junior school is (or rather was) divided into Grades 1 to 6, then senior school is called Forms 1 to 6: that is, the year after Grade 6 is Form 1. But that might be the old system: I think now it's just Year 1 to 12.

    Edit: Ah, confirmation above.
     
    As far as I know, the word "a form" is used to denote a class or a year in a school in GB, while it's called "a grade" in the US. My question is: is the word "grade" ever used in Great Britain in this sense?
    I'm tempted to say 'No - never', but somebody would surely write in saying 'My school in Crumpsall uses it.'

    So I'll just say not to my knowledge.

    Rover
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have never heard the term 'grade' used in the UK but I don't think 'form' is common these days, at least not in state schools. 'Year' seems to be the usual term, as in "Year 6 is the last year of primary school".

    Hermione
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    But what comes after Year 6 of primary school? Form 1 of secondary school?
    The current practice is to continue the numbering of years into secondary school. So: Year 7, Year 8.

    In England, you might still hear reference to Sixth Form though.

    This is different in Scotland. There, people talk about Primary 1, Primary 2, etc. and Secondary 1 or S1, Secondary 2 or S2, etc.
     

    Xander2024

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The current practice is to continue the numbering of years into secondary school. So: Year 7, Year 8.

    In England, you might still hear reference to Sixth Form though.

    This is different in Scotland. There, people talk about Primary 1, Primary 2, etc. and Secondary 1 or S1, Secondary 2 or S2, etc.
    And it means that in Scotland they say, "His son is in Primary 2" or "Their daughter is in Secondary 3", right?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    And it means that in Scotland they say, "His son is in Primary 2" or "Their daughter is in Secondary 3", right?
    Yes, that's right Xander.

    'Form' is probably used in secondary schools some other parts of the world that were formerly British - in Malaysia and Hong Kong, for example, but not India.
     
    In U.S. usage, the term ''grade'' is used for the various levels of the school system, for example grade one, grade two, etc. Just to confuse things, some call the elementary or primary levels ''grade school''. To add to the confusion, the term ''grades'' also refers to the numbers or letters indicating academic achievement, and sent to the parents on a ''report card''. A student might say ''my parents were happy with my grades'' or ''They told me to pull my grades up''
    The ''grade point average'' is an important statistic for the U.S., or Canadian, student.

    In Canada, for many years, academic achievement indicated on a ''report card'' was referred to as ''marks'', as in ''you get full marks for effort here''. Of course school systems evolve, and new terms are introduced.
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    In U.S. usage, the term ''grade'' is used for the various levels of the school system, for example grade one, grade two, etc. Just to confuse things, some call the elementary or primary levels ''grade school''.
    Not much confusing there. In elementary school, students are referred to as being in "grades". In high school, although students are occasionally referred to as being in a particular grade (especially in formal contexts), they usually are called Freshmen, Sophomore, Junior, Senior (grades 9, 10, 11, 12, respectively). Leaving aside middle school, "grade school" is where students are referred as being in a particular "grade". Pretty straight-forward.
     
    Not much confusing there. In elementary school, students are referred to as being in "grades". In high school, although students are occasionally referred to as being in a particular grade (especially in formal contexts), they usually are called Freshmen, Sophomore, Junior, Senior (grades 9, 10, 11, 12, respectively). Leaving aside middle school, "grade school" is where students are referred as being in a particular "grade". Pretty straight-forward.
    It is not confusing for you as a native speaker, and as one familiar with that school system. To the Russian who put the question originally it is not so obvious. Helping others understand is what these forums are all about.

    Cheers.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top