formed in the same way as were the planets in the inner solar system

Gijoe

Senior Member
Korean
Hello,

I really appreciate you guys help.

Here comes another question.
I am wondering if as part could be changed to other forms as i am suggesting.

Original sentence: Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as were the planets in the inner solar system.

Option 1: ... as the planets were in the inner solar system.

Option 2: ... as the planets in the inner solar system.

Thank you.
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hello,

    I really appreciate you guys help.

    Here comes another question.
    I am wondering if as part could be changed to other forms as i am suggesting.

    Original sentence: Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as were the planets in the inner solar system.

    Option 1: ... as the planets were in the inner solar system.

    Option 2: ... as the planets in the inner solar system.

    Thank you.
    Option 1 is fine - you could also put the "were" at the end of the sentence.

    Option 2 is possible, but sounds more colloquial to me without the "were".
     
    I vote for option 1, with "were" at the end of the sentence, as timpeac suggests:

    ... as the planets in the inner solar system were.

    You are explaining that moon might have been formed by the same processes that formed the planets in the inner solar system. I think the sentence works best if you keep "planets in the inner solar system" together, since they, specifically (as opposed to Jupiter, Neptune, etc.), are the point of comparison for the moon.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    An introductory adverbial phrase of manner optionally allows inversion:

    In this way were the planets of the inner solar system formed.

    The purpose of this inversion is to allow the verb to stay close to the adverbial phrase that modifies it even when that phrase is put first in the sentence. It is for this reason that a negating adverbial phrase in the same position requires inversion:

    Never were the planets of the inner solar system far from their mother star.

    The meaning of the original sentence is:

    Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as that in which were formed the planets of the inner solar system.
    = Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as that in which the planets in the inner solar system were formed.

    That of course is rather long. But when we use comparative as or than we have lots of ways to shorten the subordinate clause. Personally I would shorten this to:

    Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as the planets of the inner solar system. [Almost option 2, but with of to avoid conflicting meanings of in]

    If a verb is desired in the subordinate clause, I would advise including only the auxiliary were:

    • Not between planets and in/of [as in option 1] because that seems to make were into a main verb, as if the way that the planets were in/of the solar system was the way in which the Moon was formed (What?).

    • And not at the end, because that puts it too far from formed.

    • But just after as, since that makes the relationships clear without making the sentence too long.
     
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    Gijoe

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much everybody.

    And i have to praise Forero. I will save your note and read it in a timely manner (this was totally a wrong choice of words; I meant again and again).

    There is one difficult part to discern is the following differentiation between of and in. Would you elaborate a little?

    And another thing is the one with your own questioning braket mark; i don't think people would have a trouble if i understood you correctly (i wouldn't need a further explanation for this one)

    An introductory adverbial phrase of manner optionally allows inversion:


    as the planets of the inner solar system. [Almost option 2, but with of to avoid conflicting meanings of in]

    If a verb is desired in the subordinate clause, I would advise including only the auxiliary were:

    • Not between planets and in/of [as in option 1] because that seems to make were into a main verb, as if the way that the planets were in/of the solar system was the way in which the Moon was formed (What?).

    Thank you once again everybody for all the help.
     
    Last edited:

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as (were) the planets in the inner solar system.

    Here in and inner are being used with various meanings, but since I interpret the second in as "that (in part) make up", I feel that of means the same thing without sounding as redundant.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hello. Since the OP is about Moon's formation, I will ask my question in this thread. The following is taken from a book on Petrology.

    "Later in Chap. 6, we will discuss the origin of the highland rocks, which formed by floating plagioclase crystals in a giant ocean of magma or molten rock."

    If I were to write the same by myself, I would place a "were" in front of the "formed".

    Would my version still mean the same? I just expected to see the "were" over there.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    If I were to write the same by myself, I would place a "were" in front of the "formed".
    :thumbsup: So would I - you have discovered a mistake in the book.

    The verb should be in the passive: the highland rocks, which were formed by floating plagioclase crystals.
    or
    the highland rocks, which formed by floating plagioclase crystals (as a reduced relative clause.)


    The original means that the highland rocks formed themselves by managing to float plagioclase crystals... :eek::D
     
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    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    :)
    :thumbsup: So would I - you have discovered a mistake in the book.

    The verb should be in the passive: the highland rocks, which were formed by floating plagioclase crystals.
    or
    the highland rocks, which formed by floating plagioclase crystals (as a reduced relative clause.)


    The original means that the highland rocks formed themselves by managing to float plagioclase crystals... :eek::D
    Thank you a lot for your reply, Paul :) Apparently, the editor must have not noticed it.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I returned to the book months later, found this thread of mine, and decided to ask a question regarding Paul's reply above.

    He suggested two useful substitutes to me. As for his second suggestion, I wonder if it would make any difference in the meaning if I wish to retain the comma.

    "...The highland rocks, formed by floating plagioclase crystals..."

    "...The highland rocks formed by floating plagioclase crystals..."

    Of these two above, I wonder whether the first is also fine or not because he left out the comma above as far as I can see.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    They mean different things. The first says "The highland rocks -- incidentally, they were formed by floating plagioclase crystals ...." The second says "Only those highland rocks that were were formed by floating plagioclase crystals ...."
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    They mean different things. The first says "The highland rocks -- incidentally, they were formed by floating plagioclase crystals ...." The second says "Only those highland rocks that were were formed by floating plagioclase crystals ...."
    Thank you for clearing it up!
     
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