Formen des Zustandspassivs mit Modalverb/FII

Nussschnecke

Member
Hungarian
Hallo Zusammen,

Lately I have found on the Internet the forms of Zustandpassiv with modals in all tenses. My question is regarding Futur II, well, I know it's fully theoretical, but I dont't understand something.

1.
Here for example: Leserfrage: "Wie heißen die Formen des Zustandspassivs mit Modalverb?"

Präsens: Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen sein
Präteritum: Die Geschäfte mussten geschlossen sein
Perfekt: Die Geschäfte haben geschlossen sein müssen
Plusquamperfekt: Die Geschäfte hatten geschlossen sein müssen
Futur I: Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen sein müssen

Futur II: Die Geschäfte werden haben geschlossen sein müssen (not: Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen.)


2.
On other pages, for example here: Deutsch lernen | Passiv: Zustandspassiv (sein-Passiv) - Sprakuko - Deutsch lernen online
it is created some other way (with another example):

Futur II: Ein Liebesroman wird geschrieben gewesen sein müssen. (not: Ein Liebesroman wird haben geschrieben sein müssen.)

My question is: which method of creating Futur II is correct? Both of them?? If both, which one sounds better for native speakers?

Thanks a lot!

Nussschnecke
 
  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Futur II: Die Geschäfte werden haben geschlossen sein müssen
    Not quite. @JClaudeK is right, this is the correct form:
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen.

    It seems you have mixed up two base forms, which are both possible:
    1. Die Geschäfte sind geschlossen.
    2. Die Geschäfte haben geschlossen.
    The modal Futur II versions of 1. and 2. are, respectively:
    1. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen. (as above)
    2. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen.

    But as @Kajjo and @JClaudeK said, there is hardly any real world use for such a form.

    PS:
    To make things worse, there is a distinction between the above versions where there modal verb expression is in Futur II and a version (with a different meaning) where only the main verb is in Futur II:
    1. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gewesen sein werden.
    2. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gehabt haben werden.
    But these forms are completely academic and have no practical relevance. It is a theoretical extension from a real world expression in present (not future) perfect:
    1. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gewesen sein.
    2. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gehabt haben.
     
    Last edited:

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    Ich habe versucht, mir ein Beispiel einfallen zu lassen, das sich korrekt anhört:
    Der Brief soll geschrieben haben worden sein.
    Der Brief wird geschrieben haben sein sollen. - das hört sich richtig an, ist aber anders strukturiert als

    Futur II: Ein Liebesroman wird geschrieben gewesen sein müssen.
    Weiter weiss ich nicht. . . . . .
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Der Brief soll geschrieben haben worden sein.
    Der Brief wird geschrieben haben sein sollen. - das hört sich richtig an, ist aber anders strukturiert als
    Für mich klingen diese Sätze" falsch.

    Ich würde sagen:
    Der Brief soll geschrieben haben worden sein. - das ist kein Zustandspassiv, sondern ein ganz normales Passiv.

    Futur II (Zustandspassiv): Der Brief wird geschrieben haben {gewesen sein} sollen. - klingt zwar auch schrecklich, ist aber mMn. grammatisch.
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    1. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gewesen sein werden.
    2. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gehabt haben werden.
    But these forms are completely academic and have no practical relevance. It is a theoretical extension from a real world expression in present (not future) perfect:
    1. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gewesen sein.
    2. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen gehabt haben.
    Und was hälst Du hiervon ?
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    What are these sentences supposed to mean? :eek: Could someone translate them into English?
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Ein Roman wird geschrieben gewesen sein müssen.

    I suppose:

    A novel will have had to been written.
    (=There will have been a time at which point a novel already was written / had been written.)
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Thank you.

    A novel will have had to have been written. ;)

    Or: A novel will have had to have been written.

    "had" is not needed; I think it's used as some sort of reduplication.

    Is Ein Roman wird haben geschrieben gewesen sein müssen possible in German?
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein =
    the shops will have been closed.

    die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein mússen =
    The shops will need to have been closed
    I'm afraid this one is not a precise translation, and maybe it's not even correct.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein[, als du ankamst. =]
    the shops will have been closed.
    Oder aber - wahrscheinlicher: the shops must have been closed [when ..... ]
    (auf Deutsch): = Vermutlich waren die Geschäfte geschlossen , als du ankamst.

    vergl.:
    Deutschplus
    Das Futur I und das Futur II können auch eine Vermutung ausdrücken.

    Die ausgedrückte Vermutung bezieht sich beim Futur I auf ein Geschehen in der Gegenwart, beim Futur II auf ein Geschehen in der Vergangenheit.

    BeispieleZeitUmschreibung
    Sie ist nicht zu Hause. Sie wird wohl immer noch bei der Arbeit sein.Bezug auf vermutetes GegenwärtigesSie ist nicht zu Hause. Sie ist vermutlich immer noch bei der Arbeit.
    Er ist verärgert. Er wird wohl wieder mit seiner Frau gestritten haben.Bezug auf vermutetes VergangenesEr ist verärgert. Er hat vermutlich wieder mit seiner Frau gestritten.



    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen.
    - wie gesagt schon wurde: ein sehr "unwahrscheinlicher" Satz.

    What are these sentences supposed to mean? :eek: Could someone translate them into English?
    Wenn überhaupt, dann würde ich ihn auch mit "the shops must have been closed" übersetzen.
     

    Nussschnecke

    Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks a lot!
    So I keep "Ein Liebesroman wird geschrieben gewesen sein müssen" version, the rest I try to forget...
    :confused: :eek: :(
    sorry.
    For example the sentence: Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen.:arrow:

    "geschlossen gehabt haben"- I have never met, only "geschlossen haben". What is this gehabt here??? I have found on Wikipedia the so called Doppeltes Perfekt Doppeltes Perfekt – Wikipedia, maybe that?

    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen worden sein müssen. -could it be the same as the sentence:
    Die Geschäfte werden haben geschlossen werden müssen ???
     
    Last edited:

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    Thanks a lot!
    So I keep "Ein Liebesroman wird geschrieben gewesen sein müssen" version, the rest I try to forget...
    :confused: :eek: :(
    sorry.
    For example the sentence: Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen.:arrow:

    "geschlossen gehabt haben"- I have never met, only "geschlossen haben". What is this gehabt here??? I have found on Wikipedia the so called Doppeltes Perfekt Doppeltes Perfekt – Wikipedia, maybe that?

    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen worden sein müssen. -could it be the same as the sentence:
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen ???
    This "gehabt" is impossible.
     

    Nussschnecke

    Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks a lot for all the answers!
    My last question: What is the difference in meaning between these the two sentences?:

    1. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen sein müssen.
    2. Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen sein werden.

    Thanks in advance!!
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    1. The shops will have to be closed. = It's It will be necessary that the shops will be closed (for the shops to be closed).
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen worden sein.
    For this, I would say "The shops need to have been closed" or "It is necessary for the shops to have been closed."

    I don't think "It's necessary that the shops will be closed" is a viable sentence.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    What bothers me is the combination of "It's necessary that..." and "will."
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    Summing up:
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen sein müssen. = The shops will have to be closed. (Zustandspassiv, not discernible in English)
    Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen worden sein. (normal passive, no difference in English)
    does everybody agree?
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    What bothers me is the combination of "It's necessary that..." and "will."
    This reminds me what you just wrote somewhere else about precedence vs pattern based. :D
    [I]f you haven't already noticed, English is a highly precedence-based language when it comes to collocations. Much of what is or isn't idiomatic or common is simply based on what has become more or less established usage. So when we say that X sounds okay while Y sounds less idiomatic or is less likely to be used, there's often no rhyme or reason to it and it's just based on historical developments. This is to an extent the case with every language, but in English this tendency is particularly marked, and English is less forgiving than other languages when it comes to using words in conceivable but less established ways. German, for example, is more pattern-based. You can create combinations you haven't specifically seen before but that seem to make sense based on other combinations you've seen, and this is much more likely to work in German than in English.

    It is quite obvious what It's necessary that the shops will have been closed means: There is now a necessity that in the future a certain actions (closing of the shops) will have been completed. This is an unlikely things to say that way. It is the same in German: Es ist notwendig, dass die Geschäfte geschlossen sein werden is an equally unlikely and odd sounding sentence. But as it has no syntax flaws and a crystal clear semantic it would still be considered well formed and meaningful.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    But as it has no syntax flaws and a crystal clear semantic it would still be considered well formed and meaningful.
    I don't think so. English "will" and German "werden" are not used the same way, and I think some of those differences are in fact due to syntactic restrictions. Furthermore, I don't think the intended meaning would be clear, let alone crystal clear, to a native English speaker: the sentence is about a possibility, something that may or may not happen, which clashes with "will."
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Summing up:
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen sein müssen. = The shops will have to be closed. (Zustandspassiv, not discernible in English)
    Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen worden sein. (normal passive, no difference in English)
    does everybody agree?
    I agree basically, only the meaning is very different.
    Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen sein müssen. - it will be necessary that the shops will be closed. (They'll have to be ...)
    Die Geschäfte müssen geschlossen worden sein. - I suppose that the shops have been closed.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The modal Futur II versions of 1. and 2. are, respectively:
    1. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen. (as above)
    2. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen.
    Usage: Note that these sentences can mean suppositions about past tense. And this is the usage were I can imagine the phrase is used more frequently than in the future sense.

    I suppose that the shops were to be closed./... were closed.

    Duden: werden

    werden:


    1. a) zur Bildung des Futurs; drückt Zukünftiges aus
      ...
      b) kennzeichnet ein vermutetes Geschehen
      ...
    2. zur Bildung des Passivs

    PS: 1b meaning - the sentence may be passive or active depending on the sentence and context.

    In case of:

    1. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gewesen sein müssen.
    2. Die Geschäfte werden geschlossen gehabt haben müssen.

    meaning: passive (Zustandspassiv) + I suppose ... they were closed.
    I would not read it as being/happening in the future without very special context.
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I don't think so. English "will" and German "werden" are not used the same way, and I think some of those differences are in fact due to syntactic restrictions. Furthermore, I don't think the intended meaning would be clear, let alone crystal clear, to a native English speaker: the sentence is about a possibility, something that may or may not happen, which clashes with "will."
    Interesting. Before answering, I would like your opinion on the following sentence:
    German: Es ist falsch, dass New York in Russland liegt.
    English: It is wrong that New York is in Russia.

    The German version is syntactically correct, semantically meaningful and factually correct. Does this apply to the English version as well?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The German version is syntactically correct, semantically meaningful and factually correct.
    It is semantically ambiguous.
    It can mean:
    1. Es stimmt nicht, dass New York in Russland liegt.
    2. Es ist nicht richtig, dass New York in Russland liegt, es sollte nicht in Russland liegen.

    Vergleiche: Es ist falsch, dass Dresden in Amerika liegt. (Hier kann es real beide Bedeutungen haben.)

    Is this also in the English version?

    English: It is wrong that Dresden is in Amerika.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    OK, the wrong/false confusion. As someone who has studies epistemology this should not have happened to me. My bad. :oops:

    The English version should be
    It is wrong false that New York is in Russia.
    In German, you cannot reproduce this distinction except through context. I meant falsch as the opposite of wahr.
     
    Top