fortnight

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merquiades

Senior Member
English (USA Northeast)
Hello everyone,
The British have a noun, "fortnight", referring to two-week's time (15 days). I am curious to know if there is a similar noun in other languages?
Americans just usually express the idea in a different way: We stay there for two weeks, a two-week stay.
Thanks in advance
 
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  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, we may say "quinzaine", refering to the number quinze (15), but it is generally used in the expression "sous quinzaine" (within a fortnight).
    The most common translation is just "quinze jours" (15 days) or "deux semaines" (two weeks).
     
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    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    In French, we may say "quinzaine", refering to the number quinze (15), but it is generally used in the expression "sous quinzaine" (within a fortnight).
    The most common translation is just "quinze jours" (15 days) or "deux semaines" (two weeks).
    In French you have to specify "une quinzaine de jours" right? It is not possible to say just "la quinzaine".
    @TheCrociato91 So in Italian you can use La quindicina as a noun? La quindicina que eravamo a Bellagio....
     
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    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Well, it's two weeks. That's half a month, so 15 days, as far as I'm concerned.
    The British English word ‘fortnight’ means 14 days, it’s as simple as that. I’ve never heard anyone use it in any other way, and I’ve yet to find a dictionary definition that differs from that.
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Doesn't fortnight mean "fourteen nights", and as such, 15 days?
    When you stay for a fortnight in a hotel, you stay for 14 nights, you arrive e.g. on Saturday, and two weeks later, you leave on Saturday. From Saturday to Saturday, this is 15 days.
     
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    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It’s two weeks, 14 days. That’s how the word is used.

    When counting x number of days hence, we don’t include the day we’re already on in the count: don’t know if that helps explain why there may be some confusion about this.

    When you stay for a fortnight in a hotel, you stay for 14 nights, you arrive e.g. on Saturday, and two weeks later, you leave on Saturday. From Saturday to Saturday, this is 15 days.
    When booking accommodation we generally specify number of nights.
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French you have to specify "une quinzaine de jours" right? It is not possible to say just "la quinzaine".
    Well, familiarly you can hear "une quinzaine", implying "une quinzaine de jours" if the context is clear, but it's particularity common in the expression "sous quinzaine", for example:
    Vous recevrez votre colis sous quinzaine (You will receive your parcel within fifteen days)
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Well, familiarly you can hear "une quinzaine", implying "une quinzaine de jours" if the context is clear, but it's particularity common in the expression "sous quinzaine", for example:
    Vous recevrez votre colis sous quinzaine (You will receive your parcel within fifteen days)
    Right, so it's not an established noun per se, to be extrapolated to any context...
    In the US, without having a noun, people tend to count in weeks rather than days. You'll receive the package within two weeks. I'll be staying at the Intercontinental hotel for two weeks (time). If you want to be technical they will include all days and nights and say "You'll enjoy a 14 night, 15 day all inclusive stay on board the Proud Mary..."
     
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    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    @merquiades Yes, you can. Although I can't say how frequently it's used. I rarely hear without the noun, but it does exist.

    quindicina
    /quin·di·cì·na/
    sostantivo femminile
    1. Serie omogenea di 15 unità, elementi, oggetti, per lo più con valore approssimativo (preceduto in tal caso dall'articolo indeterminato).
      "due q. di rose"
      • ASSOL.
        Quindici giorni, o due settimane.
        "ho fissato la pensione al mare per la prima q. di agosto"
      • ESTENS.
        Quindici giorni di lavoro o la relativa retribuzione.
        "riscuotere la q."
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish, there's catorcena but it's a rare word; even more to talk about 14 days, although you can find some (odd) examples of its use with that meaning. The usual for 14 days would be dos semanas (two weeks). On the other hand, quincena (15 days) is a usual word.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    In Greek:
    Two weeks: δύο εβδομάδες [ðio evðomaðes]
    Fifteen days time: δεκαπενθήμερο [ðekapenθimero]

    In some cases, wages in Greece are paid on a 15 days basis. Here we use "δεκαπενθήμερο", for example.
    But, in my experience, "fortnight" corresponds to "δεκαπενθήμερο". (Eg. in dictionaries, newspapers)
     
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    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    Arabic:
    أسبوعين usbuu3ayn: two weeks
    جمعتين jum3atayn: two fridays (Levantine usage)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In Dutch we call it "veertien dagen". Could there be a reason why we refer to 14 days, yet not to 21 days, etc. (For a second I thought of "quarantaine" , which is based a 40-days period of isolation, but I can imagine no special reason for this expression)

    @momai: "two Fridays (Levantine usage)" refers to 14 days, I suppose, or...?
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Quinzena also in Catalan. Generally calling two weeks "quinze dies" strikes me as more common than saying "catorze dies". And there are also the expressions d'avui en quinze (lit. "from today in fifteen"; "in two weeks' time") and even d'avui en vuit (lit. "from today in eight"; "this day next week").
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    d'avui en quinze (lit. "from today in fifteen"; "in two weeks' time") and even d'avui en vuit (lit. "from today in eight"; "this day next week")
    Same in French, but usually with weekday names, and colloquially:
    Lundi en huit/en quinze: Monday in a week's/two weeks' time
     

    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    But why do you refer to the Fridays?
    One friday is one week. Two fridays are two week or a fortnight. One would actually expect sunday to be used here since it represents the beginning of the week. Instead, it is friday, which probably:confused: has to do with the fact that the main prayer for muslims is carried out on friday.
     
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