Fortunately for us, the weather changed.

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alwayscookie

New Member
Chinese
Hi guys,

Fortunately for us, the weather changed.

This is an example sentence of 'for' from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, yet I was taught that such use of 'for' should be something like adj + for (e.g. fortunate for me, good for you, ...), I am confused because 'fortunately' here seems to be an adverb.
I searched the forum and found no one who had the same question as me, was I taught wrong?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Fortunately" is an adverb and "fortunately for us" is an adverb phrase.

    You could say "Fortunately, the weather changed", but what is fortunate for one person might not be fortunate for everyone; the people next door having a barbecue might not appreciate the rain you wanted for your lawn, so "for us" is added to modify the adverb, limiting its scope.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I was taught that such use of 'for' should be something like adj + for (e.g. fortunate for me, good for you) …… was I taught wrong?
    If you were taught that only adjectives could be used with for me/you/her grandma/the postman etc., that was wrong. But perhaps you misunderstood?
     

    alwayscookie

    New Member
    Chinese
    "Fortunately" is an adverb and "fortunately for us" is an adverb phrase.

    You could say "Fortunately, the weather changed", but what is fortunate for one person might not be fortunate for everyone; the people next door having a barbecue might not appreciate the rain you wanted for your lawn, so "for us" is added to modify the adverb, limiting its scope.
    Thanks for the reply. I kind of get this now. So when we say adj for sb., it is a reduced version of 'It is adj for sb.', and when use adv for sb., it's a detailed version for 'adv, ...'. They are basically 2 different usages of 'for', am I taking this correct?
     

    alwayscookie

    New Member
    Chinese
    If you were taught that only adjectives could be used with for me/you/her grandma/the postman etc., that was wrong. But perhaps you misunderstood?
    I was taught so, but that was about 10 year ago when I was in grade 7 or 8. Now I do understand that for the convenience of teaching, teachers had simplified the contents and omitted too much "advanced" grammar.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sometimes either an adjective or an adverb can be used to say the same thing – but that doesn’t always work:

    Luckily for the children, it was a lovely sunny day :tick:

    The fact that it was a lovely sunny day was lucky for the children :tick:

    Unfortunately
    for us, the price was too high :tick:
    It was unfortunate for us that the price was too high :tick:

    Sadly for us, the price was too high :thumbsup:
    It was sad for us that the price was too high :thumbsdown:

    Good for you! :tick: / Well for you! :cross:
     

    alwayscookie

    New Member
    Chinese
    Sometimes either an adjective or an adverb can be used to say the same thing – but that doesn’t always work:

    Luckily for the children, it was a lovely sunny day :tick:

    The fact that it was a lovely sunny day was lucky for the children :tick:

    Unfortunately for us, the p
    rice was too high :tick:
    It was unfortunate for us that the price was too high :tick:

    Sadly for us, the price was too high :thumbsup:
    It was sad for us that the price was too high :thumbsdown:

    Good for you! :tick: / Well for you! :cross:
    Thank you for these examples, that thumbs down confused me though. I cannot see the point why that is a bad sentence, while the others with the same pattern are fine. Will it be a thumbs up if I change that sentence to 'We are sad that the price was too high.'? If this is the case, I guess I have to reconsider what 'it is adj for sb.' really stands for. I currently think that 'it is adj for sb. that...' = 'sb. is adj that...'.
     
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