Fortune

Edgardg

Senior Member
Polish, Poland
Hi,
could you tell me which sentence is correct?
1) He made a fortune out of bananas.
2) He made a fortune from bananas.

I would say that 2 is correct, but I may be wrong.

Thank you.
 
  • mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    "He made a fortune out of bananas" borders on the hilarious.

    2 is not much better. Moogey's "off of" is better.

    Can't you be more specific.

    He made a fortune by importing bananas.
    He made a fortune buying and selling bananas.

    Something like that?
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,
    could you tell me which sentence is correct?
    1) He made a fortune out of bananas.
    2) He made a fortune from bananas.

    I would say that 2 is correct, but I may be wrong.

    Thank you.
    Hi. I don't believe either one is "correct" although I've heard it said both ways. If forced to choose, I'd go with 2) but I'd normally say "He made a fortune from the banana business" or "He made a fortune selling bananas".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    1 & 2 are generally OK for me, preferably 2.

    If you happen to venture this side of the Atlantic, don't say off of - unless you want to clearly define yourself as an AE-speaker.

    It is non-standard, colloquial or regional in BE.

    Check it out, and comment further if you wish, on this thread (not here):

    drop the "of"
     

    Edgardg

    Senior Member
    Polish, Poland
    "He made a fortune out of bananas" borders on the hilarious.

    2 is not much better. Moogey's "off of" is better.

    Can't you be more specific.

    He made a fortune by importing bananas.
    He made a fortune buying and selling bananas.

    Something like that?
    Hi Mgarizona,
    why does "out of bananas" seem hilarious? :)
     

    renegade angel

    Senior Member
    English, Australia
    Hi Mgarizona,
    why does "out of bananas" seem hilarious? :)

    well it sounds like you're trying to say he made a fortune out of nothing, or something stupid. its somewhat comical. it made me giggle.

    if you are actually trying to say that someone made lots of money somehow through selling bananas, or picking them, whatever it may be... it would be better if you actually wrote it in a way that explains how he made that fortune through the bananas....


    do you understand?
     

    Edgardg

    Senior Member
    Polish, Poland
    well it sounds like you're trying to say he made a fortune out of nothing, or something stupid. its somewhat comical. it made me giggle.

    if you are actually trying to say that someone made lots of money somehow through selling bananas, or picking them, whatever it may be... it would be better if you actually wrote it in a way that explains how he made that fortune through the bananas....


    do you understand?
    Oh yes, I do :) Many thanks.
     

    DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    1 & 2 are generally OK for me, preferably 2.

    If you happen to venture this side of the Atlantic, don't say off of - unless you want to clearly define yourself as an AE-speaker.

    It is non-standard, colloquial or regional in BE.

    Check it out, and comment further if you wish, on this thread (not here):

    drop the "of"
    As another BE speaker - "off of" - Yuk!:)
     

    renegade angel

    Senior Member
    English, Australia
    i have to agree with Davy, "off of" (although correct) sounds like something a small child or redneck would say =D
     
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