Foul against Germany!

JulianStuart

Senior Member
English (UK then US)
Context: A commentator's remark in a soccer match; in the example from the recent Olympic match against South Korea.

Would you interpret this as meaning that Germany committed the foul or that South Korea committed the foul?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Foulee.

    Foul against Germany! :cross: -> I would take it to mean that a member of the South Korean team fouled a German player.

    Have a look at the learned Wiki article on Sports commentators who are famous for this sort of mangled English.

    Here's a few from footballsite - Colemanballs, some hilarious 'foot-in-mouth' football quotes. Number 1 - General Football & David Coleman himself.
    "Without being too harsh on David, he cost us the match."
    Ian Wright
    "They didn't change positions, they just moved the players around."
    Terry Venables
    "They (Swindon) are still finding that they are much happier when they have the ball than when the other side has it."
    Ron Jones
    "Barnsley have started off the way they mean to begin."
    Chris Kamara
     
    Last edited:

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I would take it to mean that a chicken had wandered on to the pitch and was rubbing itself up and down a German player's leg, the way chickens do.

    Nobutseriously, I agree with PQ:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Foulee.

    Have a look at the learned Wiki article on Sports commentators who are famous for this sort of mangled English.

    Foul against Germany! :cross: -> I would take it to mean that a member of the South Korean team fouled a German player.
    Thanks Paul:) Those frames of reference are the ones I grew up with.
    In the US the "against" or "on" refers to (the record of) the person who commits the foul, not the recipient of the illegal action. It's been something that still confuses me, so I needed to check that it is (still) interpreted the way you described by some BE speakers. I've absorbed quite a few AE usages but this one still causes a "?" reaction:)

    (Thanks also for the chuckles on the Colemanballs)

    I agree with Egmont.
    A little surprised by a British English speaker using the AE form.
    I would take it to mean that a chicken had wandered on to the pitch and was rubbing itself up and down a German player's leg, the way chickens do.

    Nobutseriously, I agree with PQ:)
    Thanks ewie - either way the German is the recipient, whether it's a fowl fouling him or the S. Korean!
     
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