Found not death at the salt lick.

dll1

Senior Member
Ainu
I'm having some hard time differentiating phrases and clauses.
Help me divide these sentences into a correct grammatical structure.
From Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury:

Nonsense you look like a girl you are lots younger than Candace color in your cheeks like a girl. A face reproachful tearful an odor of camphor and of tears a voice weeping steadily and softly beyond the twilt door the twilight-colored smell of honeysuckle. Bringing empty trunks down the attic stairs they sounded like coffins French Lick. Found not death at the salt lick.
 
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  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I'm afraid this is difficult even for a native speaker with a good knowledge of grammar. Are you aware of how very unusual Faulkner's style is? Here he is running on thoughts and clauses with little regard for the grammar. It may produce good novels, but it's not really suitable for a learner of English. Is this an exercise that has been set for you?
     

    dll1

    Senior Member
    Ainu
    My mistake; I didn't mean to say correct grammatical structure. Basically, I just need to divide these sentences into self-sustained independent clauses and phrases that can stand on their own if all the other texts aren't around. I get most of it except the last part with "found not death at the salt lick"

    Nonsense / you look like a girl / you are lots younger than Candace / color in your cheeks like a girl. / A face reproachful tearful / an odor of camphor and of tears / a voice weeping steadily and softly beyond the twilt door / the twilight-colored smell of honeysuckle. / Bringing empty trunks down the attic stairs they sounded like coffins / French Lick. / Found not death at the salt lick. /
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Found not death at the salt lick.

    I understand this as "didn't find death at the salt lick'.
    Our current dictionary defines salt lick:
    • a place where wild animals go to lick naturally occurring salt deposits
    • a block of salt or a salt preparation given to domestic or farm animals to lick

    To find death at the salt lick might mean 'to die at the salt lick'. The turn of phrase "found not death" is old fashioned and literary. I associate it with the language found in the older translations of the Bible.

    Bookdrum.com has this comment

    "French Lick. Found not death at the salt lick."

    French Lick
    , a tiny spa town in Orange County, Indiana, has been a popular resort since the mid-1800s. The reference to the salt lick indicates the naturally-occurring mineral deposit that lies nearby.

    There is further discussion that relates this passage to themes found in the work as a whole. You may find it interesting.
     
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