four-abreast cross section

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Ampelfrau

Senior Member
Galego/Spanish, Spain
Hi!

I'm working on a text about a new design for commercial planes, and they explain what's new and how they did it to create a more spacious cabin:

They combined a double-bubble fuselage concept with a four-abreast cross section.


My doubt is about the 'four-abreast cross section'.
First, I'm not sure I understand what it means -- is it that there are only 4 seats per row (instead of, for instance, 6, the usual in many planes)?
Then, I'm not sure if there's a way to say this in Spanish, I mean, appart from just explaining what it is.

Any help welcome, thanks everybody!!
 
  • spodulike

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi!

    I'm working on a text about a new design for commercial planes, and they explain what's new and how they did it to create a more spacious cabin:

    They combined a double-bubble fuselage concept with a four-abreast cross section.


    My doubt is about the 'four-abreast cross section'.
    First, I'm not sure I understand what it means -- is it that there are only 4 seats per row (instead of, for instance, 6, the usual in many planes)? :tick:
    Then, I'm not sure if there's a way to say this in Spanish, I mean, appart from just explaining what it is.

    Any help welcome, thanks everybody!!
    hombro con hombro ??????????
     

    Ampelfrau

    Senior Member
    Galego/Spanish, Spain
    Thanks for your answer, spodulike!
    And for the suggestion, although I think it doesn't really fit in here -- "hombro con hombro" is being together but rather in the sense of "collaborating".
    I think the best way is to simply explain what it means, because otherwise it would be confusing. Actually at first I was confused myself because I thought it was somehow strange to describe the 'cross section' as four-abreast...
    Is it or does it sound normal in English?
    :)
     

    spodulike

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I thought it was somehow strange to describe the 'cross section' as four-abreast...
    Is it or does it sound normal in English?
    :)
    Yes it does sound a little odd. I assume that it means two sets of four seats each in a row with a central aisle. Maybe it was written for a specialist audience that would know the convention?
     

    Ampelfrau

    Senior Member
    Galego/Spanish, Spain
    Actually this is part of the advertisement, so that's why I don't want to go too complicated with vocabulary and stuff...
    But then you think it's 4 or 8 seats per row? I understood it was two seats-aisle-two seats, and therefore more spacious, which is what they wanted for this plane.
     

    spodulike

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Actually this is part of the advertisement, so that's why I don't want to go too complicated with vocabulary and stuff...
    But then you think it's 4 or 8 seats per row? I understood it was two seats-aisle-two seats, and therefore more spacious, which is what they wanted for this plane.
    In that case I have the same difficulty as you. I think you need a picture or a clear description from the manufacturer.
     
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