FR: ce qui / ce que / ce dont

MelB

Senior Member
United States English
I have a question about the following portion of a sentence.

"Et pour chaque voix en dedans de moi qui dit, «ce qui l’on puisse faire dans cet univers est tout petit,» il y en a une autre, qui dit . . ."

I get sometimes confused with whether "ce qui" or "ce que" is appropriate. They both can mean "what" in English. In the initial sentence I chose "ce qui" because I thought it is a subject for "est." Am I correct to have used "ce qui" instead of "ce que"?

Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one.
See also

FR: qui / que / dont
FR: que / qui - pronoms relatifs
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    It should be 'ce que'. The reason is that it is not the subject of 'est' but the object of 'faire'. The subject of 'est' is the whole of the preceding relative clause:

    [ce que l'on peut faire dans cet univers] est tout petit

    Or, another (unconventional) way of looking at it is to divide the 'ce que' and see 'que' as the object of 'faire' and 'ce' (defined by the following relative clause) as the subject of 'est':

    ce [que l'on peut faire dans cet univers] est tout petit

    'what you're left with, in effect, is 'c'est tout petit'.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yes, I think the others are quite right. If the "what" is doing the verb it is "ce qui" eg "ce qui est incroyable" "what is unbelievable" whereas "ce que" is the object of the verb "ce que j'ai fait hier" "what I did yesterday".

    For completeness sake you can create this construction for any preposition -

    Ce à quoi tu penses - what you are thinking about
    Ce pour quoi tu as tué - what you killed for
    Ce sans quoi tu ne seras jamais libre - what you'll never be free without
     

    Anne345

    Senior Member
    France
    Neither with subjunctive !
    […]
    "Et pour chaque voix en dedans de moi qui dit, «ce que l’on peut faire dans cet univers est tout petit,» il y en a une autre, qui dit . . ."
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    zonbette

    Senior Member
    French
    comme l'a dit Aupik:

    qui s'emploie lorsque le pronom est le sujet du verbe auquel il est rattaché (ce qui est agréable à lire - qui est sujet du verbe être)

    et que lorsqu'il est l'objet (ce que je pense - je est le sujet penser et que le complément d'objet)
     

    Flame-Surfer

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Sorry for another question so quickly, but what can I say, I love to learn!

    Ce qui, Ce que et Ce dont, all mean: what.

    But when you use them?!

    Merci en avance,

    Alex.
     

    Hyppolite

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    It depends on what follows.
    Je sais ce que tu fais = "ce" is the direct object (faire quelque chose) of the verb "faire"
    Je sais ce qui me fait plaisir = "ce" is the agent of the verb "faire plaisir"
    Je sais ce dont j'ai envie = "ce" is the indirect object (avoir envie de quelque chose) of the verb "avoir envie"
    Hope it's clear enough..
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    "dont" means "of which" or "of who". Le livre dont je vous ai parlé - the book of which I spoke to you - the book I talked to you about.

    ce qui and ce que both mean "what", but "ce qui" is a subject and "does" the verb and "ce que" is the object and has the verb done to it.

    Ce qui t'inquiète (c'est le...)- what is worrying you (is the...)
    Ce que je ne comprend pas - what I don't understand.

    You can think of both "ce qui" and "ce que" as literally "that which".
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    Dont is used if the verb in the relative clause would require a de after it.

    Voilà le livre dont j'ai besoin. (J'ai besoin de ce lvre et le voilà)

    Ce qui is a subject relative pronoun when we don't have a specific antecedent (word to which we're referring): Ce qui est intéressant, c'est le cinéma français.

    Ce que is the direct object equivalent: Ce que tu dis m'intéresse beaucoup.

    Ce dont is the equivalent that we use with a verb requiring de after it: Prends ce dont tu as besoin.
     

    JynnanTonnyx

    Member
    English speaker - Ireland
    In my experience, ce qui and ce que replace the English 'what' in alot of french sentences:

    I can't see what's on the table - Je ne peux pas voir ce qui est sur la table

    And que and qui replace the English 'that' or 'who'.

    I can't see who's at the table - Je ne peux pas voir qui est à la table

    These are by no means hard and fast rules and I know comparing everything to English is a terrible way to learn French but thinking like this always helped me when I wasn't sure.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    "ce que" is used when a NOUN follows it
    "ce qui" is used when a VERB follows it

    for example:

    "Je ne sais pas ce que le garçon a fait" (le garçon being a noun)
    "Je ne sais pas ce qui se passe" (se passer being a verb)
     

    zaby

    Senior Member
    When you use "ce que" or "ce qui", "ce" stands for a whole clause.
    For example :
    Il donne toujours des conseil à Paul, ce qui est sympathique. -> C'est le fait qu'il donne des conseils qui est sympathique
    Il donne toujours des conseil à Paul qui est sympathique -> c'est Paul qui est sympathique

    Sometimes, what ce stands for is not explicit :
    Ce que je pense n'a pas d'importance.
    Je ne te dirai pas ce qui ne va pas
    This examples wouldn't make sense without "ce". "que" and "qui" need to refer to a noun or a pronoun
    EDIT: Reading Jynnan's post, I realize that what I wrote just above is wrong.
    "Qui" is used instead of "ce qui" when talking about a person : "Je ne te dirai pas qui est venu".
     

    zaby

    Senior Member
    linguist786 said:
    "ce que" is used when a NOUN follows it
    "Je ne sais pas ce que le garçon a fait" (le garçon being a noun)

    This is tricky because you could say "Je ne sais pas ce que fait le garçon"
    Here que is followed by a verb ;)

    que / ce que are used when they are the object complement in the relative clause and when they stand for inanimate (Je ne sais pas ce que le garçon a fait. Je connais un secret que je ne révèlerai jamais)

    qui/ ce qui
    are used when they are the subject in the relative clause (Je ne sais pas ce qui se passe; j'ai repris du gateau qui est si bon). Qui can also be used for persons when it is an object complement in the relative clause (je ne sais plus qui je dois croire).
     

    Dumpling

    New Member
    English, New Zealand.
    C'est tres difficile pour moi utiliser "ce qui" et "ce que". Je ne comprends pas quand je dois les utiliser.

    If those sentences didn't make sense, the problem is I don't know how to identify when I need to use "ce qui" and "ce que". I have read the grammar rules and understand that they are to be used to refer to something unstated and unspecificed and "ce qui" functions as the subject and "ce que" as the direct object. I just seem to not be able to identify when they are functioning in this ways.

    Does anyone have any useful tips that will help me identify when to use which one?

    For example: I don't know how to identify which one to use in the following phrases (although according to a test I did they are correct)
    Ce qui est dommage, c'est que Paw-Paw habite si loin.
    Ce que Tex regrette, c'est que Paw-Paw telephone tout le temps.

    Merci beaucoup!!!!:)
     

    CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    If you replace "ce qui" with just "ce" alone (or "cela") you will end up with a good sentence:
    "ce qui est dommage" >> :tick:"c'est dommage"
    This will not work with "ce que", even in cases where the subject does not follow immediately:
    "ce que son père regrette" >> :cross:"ce son père regrette"
    "ce que regrette son père" >> :cross:"ce regrette son père"​
     

    Petrie787

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    I am aware that both of these two phrases mean "what" but I am hazy on the way in which they can be used.
    For example, does this sentence translate correctly?

    "I don't know what to do!" --->

    "Je ne sais pas ce qui faire!"

    Or this one...

    "Tell me what happened."

    "Dites-moi ce qui s'est passé."

    Thanks!
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    Dites-moi ce qui s'est passé is ok, but for the other one: Je ne sais pas quoi faire. It's also possible to say je ne sais que faire, in a quite old-fashioned way.
     

    89I

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    Both are relative pronouns.

    Ce que/ce qu' (object) is followed by a subject.
    Il fait ce que vous demandez.
    Il fait ce qu'on demande.

    Ce qui (subject) is followed by a verb
    Il fait ce qui est important. (the "i" on qui is not dropped before a vowel like the "e" on que).
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    Beware of the pronoun that can follow que/qui. If it's not the subject of the verb that follows, qui has to be used:
    Il fait ce qui me plait.
    Il dit ce qui lui passe par la tête.
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    Yes, it is possible, but it's not required. Just a question of style. Je ne sais pas ce que ces gens-là font is as correct as the other one, even if less usual.
     

    capri7

    Member
    hindi, India
    hi
    how can u make out where to use "ce qui" "ce que" or "ce dont'...they have almost the same meaning as i think.
    thanks
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Ce qui is used as a subject of a verb, ce que is the direct object of a verb (even though it written before it), and ce dont (of which) is an indirect object that includes the preposition de, or of.

    Moderator note: please make your best effort to use proper capitalization and spelling (you, rather than u). Thanks.
     

    stupot

    Senior Member
    Scotland, English
    i'm really struggling to understand the difference between 'ce que' and 'ce qui' ... i don't know when to us ce qui really i just normally use ce que unless it's a phrase such as '' .......... which was great '' ''......... ce qui était génial ''


    Il y a quelqu'un qui peut m'aider?? merci d'avance xxx
     

    mysteriouscreep

    Senior Member
    English
    I want what he has! = Je veux ce qu'il a! (ce que)
    I know what's the problem! = Je sais ce qui est le probleme! (ce qui)

    "Ce que" if it's going to be followed by a subject (Je, nous, André, mes parents, etc ...)
    "Ce qui" if it's going to be followed by a verb.

    (Au moins, c'est ce que j'ai appris!)
     

    Avignonais

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, Anglophone
    ce qui -- fits in the subject position in the sentence or clause. Can be person or thing. Example: Ce qui me dérange est cet homme (ou ce bruit)

    ce que -- which, fits in the object position. Thing only (not sure about person?). Example: Ce que je lui ai dit est de venir tout de suite

    ce dont -- of which, object position. Thing (not sure about using with persons). Example: Ce sont les choses dont je t'ai parlé
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    Actually, all three (ce qui, ce que and ce dont) can only be a thing, never a person.

    Ce qui me dérange est cet homme. :cross:
    Ce qui me dérange est ce bruit. (:tick:) (not incorrect but sounds a bit weird – we would rather say, Ce qui me dérange, c'est ce bruit)
    C'est ce qui me dérange. :tick:

    Ce que je lui ai dit est de venir tout de suite. (:tick:) (not incorrect, but sounds weird – we would rather say, Je lui ai dit de venir tout de suite)
    C'est ce que je lui ai dit. :tick:

    Ce sont les choses dont je t'ai parlé.
    :tick:
    C'est ce dont je t'ai parlé. :tick:
     

    Avignonais

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, Anglophone
    Thanks, Maître Capello.

    With people then do we use "celui qui", "celle qui", and "ceux qui"?

    As well as, ceux que, ceux dont..?
     

    sudest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    C'est ce qui me dérange.=That's what bother me
    C'est ce que je lui ai dit.=That's what I told him
    I'm not sure. If I'm wrong you can correct me.
     

    suggy43

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Salut! :)
    Is it correct to use "ce que" rather than "ce qui" in the following sentences?

    Il va souvent à la pêche, ce que je ne fais jamais.
    Voici ce que vous devriez faire.

    Merci beaucoup.
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Il va souvent à la pêche, ce que je ne fais jamais. :tick:
    Voici ce que vous devriez faire. :tick:

    You can only use ce que in these instances.
     

    Dixeels

    New Member
    English
    What is the difference between qui and que in terms of relative pronouns? When do you use ce qui rather than just qui? And what is the deal with dont?! If someone could shed a little bit of light on any of these topics that would be great.
     

    no_cre0

    Senior Member
    American English
    qui - relative proposition without a subject
    "Jean et Marie sont des élèves qui sont toujours en retard"

    que - relative proposition with a subjet
    "Jean m'as dit que Marie est toujours en retard"

    dont - relative proposition that includes de
    "Les livres dont j'ai besoin sont dans mon sac à dos"

    ce qui/ce que/ce dont- "that which" or "what", same rules as dont, qui and que
    "Je suis content avec ce que j'ai"
    "Ce qui m'importe c'est le processus"
    "Il est déjà parti avec ce dont j'ai besoin"
     

    janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    dans la phrase "Jean m'a dit que.....", "que" n'est pas un pronom relatif, c'est une conjonction de subordination.
     

    no_cre0

    Senior Member
    American English
    ah oui, vous avez raison. It's difficult to think of examples off of the top of my head. How about "J'ai vu le livre que tu as laissé chez moi".
     

    janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    il faut se souvenir que "que" est COD, "qui" est sujet, "dont" est COI ou C. du nom.
    Un pronom évite une répétition :
    Je lis un livre, ce livre raconte la vie de X." Le mot "livre" est répété, il est sujet du verbe "raconter", je vais donc le remplacer par le P.R. qui peut être sujet : QUI = Je lis un livre qui raconte.........
    Je lis un livre, j'ai emprunté ce livre à la bibliothèque." "ce livre" est COD du verbe "emprunter" donc QUE = je lis un livre que j'ai emprunté..........
    Je lis un livre, le professeur a parlé de ce livre hier" "ce livre" est Complément d'objet indirect de "parler", donc DONT = je lis un livre dont le professeur a parlé hier"
    je lis un livre, l'auteur de ce livre vient de mourir' "ce livre" est complément du nom "l'auteur' donc DONT = je lis un livre dont l'auteur vient de mourir"
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    The relative pronoun that is readily omitted in English is que in French (whose vowel is weak):

    the book you left at my place
    le livre que tu as laissé chez moi

    students who are always late
    des élèves qui sont toujours en retard
     

    Pinuz

    Member
    Italian
    Bonjour à tous!!
    Je ne comprend pas la difference entre "ce qui" et "ce que", est-ce que vous pouvez aider s'il vous plait?
    Merci beaucoup!
     

    Mezian10

    Senior Member
    France French
    Pas sûr d'être très clair, mais voici la distinction: "ce qui" représente un sujet dans une phrase alors que "ce que" représente un objet. Ainsi après "ce qui" tu as un verbe alors qu'après "ce que" tu as un sujet.
    ex: ce qui revient au même - ce que tu as fait

    En anglais ce serait la distinction entre "that which" or "the thing which"
     
    Last edited:

    Pinuz

    Member
    Italian
    Par exemple:
    "differémment de ce que (ou ce qui) s'est produit dans le cas précédent"
    "selon ce que (ou ce qui) a été affirmé par le professeur"
    "ce que (ou ce qui) a emergé dans l'entretien"

    Merci beaucoup!!!
     

    weena

    Senior Member
    français (de France)
    Pour donner un autre exemple:

    Il m'a offert des fleurs, ce qui m'a séduit. = "Le fait qu'il m'offre des fleurs m'a séduit" (ce qui = sujet)

    Il a dit qu'il n'avait rien volé, ce que je crois = "Je crois au fait qu'il n'ait rien volé" (ce que = complément d'objet)
     

    weena

    Senior Member
    français (de France)
    "differémment de ce qui s'est produit dans le cas précédent"
    "selon ce qui a été affirmé par le professeur"
    "ce qui a emergé dans l'entretien"
     

    sarah82

    Senior Member
    French-France
    Tu dois utiliser ce qui dans tes 3 exemples.
    Pour essayer d'expliquer :

    Ce que je fais = je fais cette chose
    ce qui me plaît = la chose qui me plaît

    Ce que, c'est le complément d'objet du verbe. Ce qui, c'est le sujet du verbe.

    Ce qui s'est produit = la chose qui s'est produite
    ce qui a été affirmé = la chose/l'idée qui a été affirmée
    ce qui a émergé dans l'entretien = les choses qui ont émergé dans l'entretien.

    Mais :
    ce qu'a affirmé le professeur (ce que a affirmé le prof) = la chose que le professeur a affirmé.

    Est-ce plus clair ?
     

    Mezian10

    Senior Member
    France French
    Par exemple:
    "différemment de ce qui s'est produit dans le cas précédent"
    "selon ce qui a été affirmé par le professeur"
    "ce qui a emergé dans l'entretien"

    Dans tous les cas ce sont des subordonnées dans lesquelles "ce qui" est sujet de la phrase
     
    Top