FR: ce X qu'est Y

Dupon

Senior Member
Chinese
En matière fiscale par exemple, François Hollande lui-même vient de ressortir ce vieux serpent de mer qu’est « le prélèvement à la source » de l’impôt sur le revenu.
(From Le Figaro)

Here in my understanding, "qu’est" is "qui+est"? But normally I know "qui" can not be elided. So why here "qui" could be elided? From the other posts of the forum, I guess it is an oral usage, but I am not sure on this so I hope to confirm here.

Thanks!
 
  • janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    qu'est = que est
    il vient de ressortir ce vieux serpent de mer que « le prélèvement à la source » de l’impôt sur le revenu est.
    il vient de ressortir un vieux serpent de mer, « le prélèvement à la source » de l’impôt sur le revenu est ce vieux serpent de mer.
    Le pronom relatif attribut "que" évite cette répétition en remplaçant "ce vieux serpent de mer"
     

    Albatrosspro

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Mathematics tells us that if A=B, B=A. Still, many writers have a preference for which part of the "being" clause comes first, and often the meaning changes. This is in fact que est, not qui est, which means that here (as in many places in French) the order is technically inverted. ...Ce vieux serpent qu'est le prélèvement = ce vieux serpent que le prélèvement est, or finally by itself: le prélèvement est un vieux serpent. It is que instead of qui, which means that the writer really wanted to say this last thing, and not that un vieux serpent est le prélèvement.

    Maybe that helps too.
     
    Last edited:

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    Here in my understanding, "qu’est" is "qui+est"?
    You are mistaken. Here qu'est is the elision of "que est".

    Le prélèvement à la source (subject) est un vieux serpent de mer (predicate). :thumbsup:ce vieux serpent de mer qu'est le prélèvement à la source :thumbsup: = ce vieux serpent de mer que le prélèvement à la source est :thumbsup:
    Un vieux serpent de mer (subject) est le prélèvement à la source (predicate). :thumbsdown: (doesn't make much sense) ↔ ce vieux serpent de mer qui est le prélèvement à la source :thumbsdown:

    See FR: Inversion sujet-verbe dans les propositions relatives (introduites par que, dont, où).
    See also this recent related discussion on the Français Seulement forum: l'enfant qu'a été cette personne.
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    @Maître Capello

    Hello,
    I'm reviving this old thread, because the above logic doesn't work in every context, or at least it doesn't for me.


    1. « Le pont offre un large panorama avec un point de vue à 360 degrés sur ce couloir paysager qu’est le Rhône »
    vs.
    2. « Le pont offre un large panorama avec un point de vue à 360 degrés sur ce couloir paysager qui est le Rhône »

    I think I can easily imagine myself saying:


    Le Rhône (subject) est ce couloir paysager (predicate).
    Ce couloir paysager (subject) est le Rhône (predicate).


    I know that the first sentence (qu'est le Rhône) sounds more natural, but doesn't the second one also work? It makes sense to me.

    Thanks again.
     

    olivier68

    Senior Member
    French Paris France
    The "problem" (ambiguity) comes from the fact that you use the very generic "être" as the verb. Maybe an other one would be more appropriate, such as "constituer"/"former"...
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Yes, I just wanted to make sure that in certain contexts "qu'est" and "qui est" are both okay, without much of a difference.

    Merci à tous les deux ! :)
     
    Top