FR: futur proche / futur simple

jemappelleK80

Senior Member
I think I have figured out the key to futur proche and futur simpe, but i was hoping to verify with some natives....

futur proche : quand je veux dire "i am going to" en anglais
futur simple: quand je veux dire "i will" en anglais

mais les deux sont également probable de se passent dans l'avenir.

je suis désolée pour mon franglais....

~K

Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
 
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  • depassage

    Member
    France; French
    'lo,

    I will do this later : Je le ferai plus tard.
    I'm going to do it right now : Je vais le faire tout de suite.

    In fact, it's very close to english, since the same verb (go->aller, in french) is used for the futur proche.
     

    Catani

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Hello all

    I've tried to find info using a forum-search, but haven't found exactly what I'm after.

    Q. is there any definite proximity-in-time distinction that differentiates between using, say

    Je vais partir and je partirai?

    I have (at least, used to have) in my mind a vague guideline that the purer futur simple (the second one above) refers to events farther into the future.
    But then I have these doubts that lead me to say, e.g.

    Je vais partir en vacances juillet de l'année prochaine

    ...and believe that this is interchangeable [?] with

    Je partirai en vacances [...]

    Y a quelqu'un qui puisse mettre au clair pour moi ce point de grammaire?

    Merci d'avance et ciao

    Catani
     

    Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    In my opinion, the difference between the two forms is the same as the difference between the "be going to" and the "will" forms in English.
     

    zam

    Senior Member
    England -french (mother tongue) & english
    Yes, you're right J-M about 'be going to' and 'will', but whilst 'be going to' always expresses an immediate future ('immediate' here being relative) like 'je vais...', 'will' is not always 'as plain a future' as the French plain future ('rai', etc. at the end of a verb). Consider:

    - I'll go now/I'll toddle off now = bon, je m'en vais
    - I'll get the door = je vais ouvrir, etc, etc.

    ('will' also has many more uses of course: habit, consent, request, likelihood, etc. but that's beside the point here).

    To me, 'je vais partir + action' (intention in the future) is the same as 'je partirai' (but I'm no grammar expert !).


    '
     

    denis-a-paris

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi all,

    I am a first year French student and have recently learned that the technical term for "aller + infinitive" is known as "future proche", literally translated as "the near future". I'm not sure if it is really used that way (it seems to be), but that's what we learned. Of course, the "near future" is a very relative term. 1 minute, 1 day, 1 year in the future all could work.

    As J-M and zam have said, I find it also closely related to "I am going to <verb>" v. "I will <verb>" in english.

    Cheers,
    -denis
     

    Cuckoo

    Member
    India, Speak:English, Hindi and some Indian languages
    Hi All,

    I just happened to see this post today while browsing. As I am also a beginner's level student of french language, I thought I can share my views on this. I agree with Denis as far as definition of "futur proche" is concerned.
    "Je vais partir" is Futur Proche and "je partirai" is Futur Simple.
    The difference between them is that in Futur Proche we are sure of doing things in 1 minute, 1 day, 1 year or whatever may the case be whereas in Futur Simple, it's probable chance or the time/place is not known.

    In Catani's example, Je vais partir en vacances juillet de l'année prochaine is Future Proche (we are sure of the activity) but Je partirai en vacances is Future Simple (we don't know when or where).

    Also,
    two verbs(vais, partir in the above example) are used for Futur Proche while Futur Simple has only one verb(partirai).

    Hope this clarifies it furthur.

    Cheers!!!
    Cuckoo
     

    davidmaskill23

    Member
    English, UK
    please could you answer some questions?

    is this tense used mainly for speaking.

    is it as simple as, which ever form of aller and the infinitive?

    je vais manger
    tu vas manger
    il va manger
    nous allons manger
    vous allez manger
    ils vont manger

    thanks!
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    please could you answer some questions? yes :D

    is this tense used mainly for speaking. :tick: Sometimes we use the present tense as well (as in English).

    is it as simple as, which ever form of aller and the infinitive? :tick: (sometimes French can be easy)

    je vais manger
    tu vas manger
    il va manger
    nous allons manger
    vous allez manger
    ils vont manger
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    I suppose your book is about conjugation but as you pointed out rightly, there is nothing to conjugate really: it's just the conjugated form of "aller" + the infinitive of the verb.
    This is different from the "futur simple" where there are exceptions, ... :
    devoir: je devrai: je vais devoir
    pouvoir: je pourrai: je vais pouvoir

    Does it answer your question? :confused:
     

    hellokitty

    New Member
    Toronto--I speak English
    Hello!
    I've learned in school to use the future tense like this:
    Je parlerai....
    However, I've seen people speak more like this:
    Je vais parler....

    Is there any difference? Are they interchangeable when writing/speaking?

    Thanks!
    HelloKitty


     
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    Lany

    Senior Member
    French Canada
    We mostly use "Je vais parler" in spoken French altough both are very much the same. Je parlerai is most likely to be seen written in novels or can often be heard in narration.

    If you want to sound natural, use "Je vais parler".

    Hope this helps.
     

    andrewsco

    New Member
    England
    Hi,

    If I wanted to say I am going to fix the barn would I say this? And he is going to fix the barn also?

    Je reparai le toit de grange

    Il repara le toit de grange

    Thanks
    Andrew
     

    andrewsco

    New Member
    England
    Ok,

    I'm a little confused. I was under the impression that to form the future tense you do what I did. Do you always use either je vais or je suis depending on which one it requires?

    Perhaps someone could explain the difference?

    Thanks
     

    Franglais1969

    Senior Member
    English English, français rouillé
    You didn't use the future. You said "I am going to" Je vais faire quelque chose;

    The future would indicate "I shall fix"....
     

    Nomnom

    Member
    Canada - English
    Hi there,

    How exactly do you distinguish using futur proche from using futur simple? They are both in the future but with futur proche the end is in sight?

    Ex: If I wanted to say, "He will be going to Japan in January (elapsed time of approximately 2 months)" would you use futur proche or futur simple?

    Thanks so much.
     

    alargeau

    Senior Member
    France
    I think you should distinguish tense from time.
    Futur simple is a tense and futur proche is a time.
    I can express futur proche (near future) with the present tense for instance: je pars demain (I'm leaving tomorrow). Note that this is also possible in English.
    Will can express either futur proche or futur lointain.
     

    Oluc (Yvon)

    Banned
    Français, English
    Le "futur proche" n'existe pas proprement parlant en français. On rend le "near future" en utilisant le verbe ALLER, comme en anglais : "Je partirai demain pour Tokyo" (I will go/be going to ... ) ou "Je VAIS partir demain" (I'm GOING to leave tomorrow).
     

    alargeau

    Senior Member
    France
    Je ne suis pas tout à fait d'accord avec vous. Le futur proche n'existe pas non plus alors en anglais. En français, je peux tout à fait dire 'je pars demain'. Il faut donc bien distinguer le temps (tense) du temps (time).
     

    Oluc (Yvon)

    Banned
    Français, English
    Je disais que "futur proche" n'existe pas, ni en français ni en anglais, dans la nomenclature des conjugaisons, contrairement à l'italien qui a un "passé proche". Dans les deux langues, on obtient ce "futur proche" en utilisant le verb "aller" ou "to go".
    Le présent "Je pars demain" se rend en anglais par le "present continuous" : "I'm leaving tomorrow".
     

    alargeau

    Senior Member
    France
    D'accord, je comprends mieux maintenant ce que vous vouliez dire.
    Notons tout de même que le present continuous employé comme futur implique un arrangement défini, ce qui n'est pas forcément vrai en français.
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    The near future (futur proche) is constructed using the auxiliary aller + infinitive:

    Je mangerai (futur)
    Je vais manger (futur proche)

    Tu viendras (futur)
    Tu vas venir (futur proche)

    Elle partira (futur)
    Elle va partir (futur proche)
     

    helsbells4

    New Member
    English - Australian
    What is the difference between the true future tense (e.g. je ferai) and the future expression using "aller faire" (e.g. je vais faire)

    In English, the way I understand it, we use the true future tense (e.g. I will do) for example when we have just decided to do it, it's a new idea (e.g. You know what, I'll do the dishes once we've finished). Whilst the future expression using "going to do" is to express plans that have already been made and are definite (e.g. Next month I'm going to start my project).

    I know there are overlaps though... How does it work in French?
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hi,
    It does not work exactly in the same way.
    The difference is not how thoroughly you have planned to do something, it resides in the distance of the future you are expressing.
    If you consider that this future is not very distant, you use the "aller faire" form.
    Otherwise, you use the true future tense.

    (But this distance is very relative, according to your context, of course.)
     
    Hello,

    Although what Fred C is saying is correct, know that in Canada, le futur proche (je vais faire) and le futur simple (je ferai) are interchangeable.

    Canadians will mostly use le futur proche when they speak, and le futur simple when they write.

    Brig!
     

    Thrillhouse85

    Member
    English - Canada
    I don't undertand the difference between:

    "Je vais bien m'amuser ce soir"

    and

    "Je m'amuserai bien ce soir"



    What's the difference?
     

    janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    il n'y a pas de différence !
    aller + infinitif = futur proche/immédiat, on utilise beaucoup cette forme quand on parle et on l'utilise de préférence pour des actions qui seront faites dans peu de temps
     

    Michel09

    Senior Member
    français - France
    I don't undertand the difference between:
    "Je vais bien m'amuser ce soir"
    and
    "Je m'amuserai bien ce soir"

    You can think of the first as the "immediate future" (as exists in English). This is formed by using the conjugated verb to go (aller) + an infinitive. Thus, in your example, "I am going to have fun this evening."

    The second is the actual future tense of a verb. "I will have fun this evening."

    I hope that helps.
     
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    Anna Märta

    New Member
    Swedish
    ce qui sont les différences entre futur simple et futur + aller.

    What are the difference between e.g. je vais aller and je irai?

    What are you supposed to use when and in what contexts?

    Merci!
     

    lidboymk2

    Senior Member
    English
    Je vais à Londres vs j'irais à Londres

    I understand that I am going and I will got to London are very similar, which is the more definite or clear please svp
     

    Ellea1

    Senior Member
    Southern French
    Hello,

    Je vais à Londres = I am going to London. (You're sure about it, you have booked your plane ticket, etc.)

    J'irai à Londres = I will go to London. (You don't know when (the precise date) you will go, nothing has been organized yet)
     
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    Gérard Napalinex

    Senior Member
    French - France
    You need to be careful here

    J'irais à Londres = I would go to London
    J'irai à Londres = I shall go to London

    I assume your question excludes the conditional form.

    That being said, "je vais à Londres" shows a bit more certainty, meaning all your travel details are fixed.
    "J'irai à Londres" would tell you have some points not settled yet, maybe because it is in a less near future.
    That is a pretty subtle difference anyway.
     

    Bichelousse

    New Member
    Canadian French
    In the BDL (Banque de Dépannage Linguistique), they say that what characterizes the futur proche is mainly that it is the only futur to be used when an action is on the verge of being realized. There is one main futur temporal reference point, and it can be occupied by the futur simple or the futur proche. The only difference between the two is register. Just like you would use the Tu and the Vous. To the extent that the futur simple can be used in oral speech to signal closure. Ex. Finalement, j'pense pas que j'irai avec vous. And even then, I could replace the futur simple by the futur proche. Ex. Finalement, j'pense pas que je vais y aller avec vous.
    There is a parallel with English to be made. Essentially, 'going to' is the equivalent of Aller + infinitive. Ex. I'm gonna call you tomorrow. Je vais t'appeler demain. And 'I will' corresponds to J'irai. Ex. I will definitely call you. Je vous appellerai sans faute. However, like in French, you could replace the futur simple by the futur proche. Ex. I'm definitely gonna call you. Je vais t'appeler sans faute. Only a question of register.
    Be weary of definitions such as that Futur proche is more certain and Futur simple is less sure. Like we have just seen, in contexts of Certainty, both are interchangeable.
    I will add on this thread, and enforce the fact that the difference is merely register, and this is illustrated by the fact that we tend to use more often the futur simple in the written language because written language tends to be more formal (though not always).

    To sum up. There is one main futur temporal reference point, this one can be either expressed by the futur simple (+formal speech) or the futur proche (-formal speech).

    The true futur proche, in form and in character, has its reference point in the present and the only possible form is the futur proche (BDL).

    And there is no such thing as certain or uncertain for the futur simple or its unformal Form Futur proche.
     

    soleil-sol

    Senior Member
    English-American
    Bonjour, I want to know if this sentence is gramatically correct. Il va arriver bientôt., or if I should say, Il arrivera bientôt. Are they both correct?
    va arriver, sounds to me as if va is an auxiliary verb that I can't find when I look up the different conjugations of arriver.
    Thank you in advance.
     

    catay

    Senior Member
    Canada anglais
    "Il va arriver" is the "futur proche" or near future use of the verb "aller" (conjugated in the present tense) + the infinitive to express that something will happen soon and is most often employed in oral language, a construction that is used in English as well: "He is going to arrive soon."
     
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    WannaBFluent

    Senior Member
    Français
    il va arriver bientôt is correct but strange French, because as you say bientôt you don't really have to add va, because they both mean the same thing, that it is going to happen soon. so you should say, il va arriver or il arrive bientôt. (sound colloquial)
    anyway il arrivera bientôt is correct 100%, and it sounds more formal.
     

    sansserif

    Member
    Swedish – Sweden
    Hi,

    I'm trying to understand the difference between futur proche and futur simple. I have these two sentences in my textbook that I'm asked to translate into French. Now, these are originally in Swedish and I've translated them into English, but what I want you to talk about is if it's possible to know whether these sentences should be in futur proche or futur simple. Because without context, I'm almost thinking it could be either.

    1. We will/We're going to bring magazines and books there. – Could be said a week or a minute before leaving for "there".
    2. They will/They're going to ski there. – Again, we have no idea of when the skiing will happen.

    Note that I believe it could be either will or be going to.
     
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    Pauline Meryle

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Just wanted to comment that in your first sentence, in English you would say "take" rather than "bring". I see no difference between the two forms of the future tense in that example.

    In the second sentence, "going to" sounds better because it leaves the question of timing more open.
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    In your second sentence, the futur simple tense sounds off to me.

    "Ils skieront là-bas" amounts to saying "They will ski there". In other word, they're going to do this once, and then walk off. I suspect it would be more common to say They will be skiing there in English (but I'm not native speaker), because the futur simple ("skieront / will ski") would imply a single one-off action in both languages (whereas their skiing is likely to be something "continuous").

    In your first sentence, I think the straight-up rule applies. If the action is going to happen very soon and is clearly established in your mind, then the futur proche is a safer bet. On the other hand, if it's more of schedule, the futur simple will probably work better.
     
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